Shawnee Self-Guided Historic Walking Tour

May 27, 2016 | Author: Opal Stevens | Category: N/A
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1 Shawnee Self-Guided Historic Walking Tour The history of The Shawnee Inn and Golf Resort and the village of Shawnee on...

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Shawnee Self-Guided Historic Walking Tour The history of The Shawnee Inn and Golf Resort and the village of Shawnee on Delaware are rich with stories, landmarks and facilities that have existed for hundreds of years in this fertile land that borders the Delaware River. Long ago, this area was covered by glacial ice fields. One of the last glaciers, the Wisconsin Glacier, as it melted, carved the Delaware Water Gap and deposited fertile topsoil and the stones that create the identity of the Delaware River Valley. This massive glacial movement created the two large islands on either side of the village that is known today as Shawnee on Delaware. Start your tour at one of the benches that sit along the river on our grand front lawn. 100 Shawnee Inn Drive, Shawnee on Delaware, Pennsylvania 18356 800-SHAWNEE (742-9633)

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As you stand and look at the river and surrounding landscape, it is the fertile terrain you see that eventually attracted the first inhabitants of this area. There is archaeological evidence that Paleolithic man lived here at least 10,000 years ago, after the glacial period. A dig in the early 70’s, by the National Geographic Society, confirmed this fact through the carbon dating of arrowheads and other tools found in the area. The thick forests of Worthington State Forest across the river, the temperate climate, the substantial shad run here in the Delaware River, the abundance of game in the surrounding landscape, and the natural fertility of this beautiful land make this a desirable place to live. Walk towards the large Pavilion known as “The River Sanctuary” and after you pass it on the river side stop in front of the large black topped area.

STOP A As you drink in the beauty of the river and its surroundings, imagine the people that lived off this land. Archeologists have established that the Lenape Indians dominated the Delaware Region perhaps as early as the 11th Century. The Lenapes were comprised of three main clans: the wolf, the turtle and the turkey. The Wolf clan settled in the Shawnee area and was also known as the Minsi tribe. Their main village was located on the New Jersey side, 100 Shawnee Inn Drive, Shawnee on Delaware, Pennsylvania 18356 800-SHAWNEE (742-9633)

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somewhere just opposite of where you are standing now. A word about the Shawnee Indians, they spent only a little time in this area and after a disturbance with the Lenape left this valley. The River Sanctuary On your right, the large brick floored Pavilion is called our River Sanctuary. Originally built as a picnic Pavilion in the late 1970’s, it was initially called the Governor’s Pavilion and its name has only been recently changed to reflect the renovation and reliance on this facility as a wedding location. Couples that are married here are invited to place their names in the Pavilion and to return to remember the special time they shared here. New Jersey Directly across the river is New Jersey and the sight of what was once called Buckwood Park. When CC Worthington opened the Inn, Buckwood Park was for his guests to picnic, relax or play games. He operated a ferry from this side of the river directly to Buckwood Park. Today that is Worthington State Forest. The Appalachian Trail runs across the top of it and there is a great hike from the New Jersey side to Sunfish Pond.

100 Shawnee Inn Drive, Shawnee on Delaware, Pennsylvania 18356 800-SHAWNEE (742-9633)

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Historic Ferry System The large body of water in front of you is the Delaware River. Before the construction of many bridges and the development of additional roadways, ferries were used to cross the Delaware River. Starting in 1736, James Gould, introduced ferries to this area. He gave his ferry an Indian name, "Nanatuman", but most local folks called it "Gould's Ferry", The second ferry owner and operator, the man named Shoemaker, took over Gould's business around 1760. His family, which operated ferries at several different river locations, stayed on the job here for at least fifty years, until they sold the business to Jacob Brotzman. Jacob Brotzman went into this ferry business in the early 19th Century and established a home for himself and family right on the Jersey shore. Brotzman worked hard, made some money, and took part in the rapid growth of this river-front settlement. In the second half of the 19th Century this 100 Shawnee Inn Drive, Shawnee on Delaware, Pennsylvania 18356 800-SHAWNEE (742-9633)

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now-prosperous ferry business was purchased by Charles Walker and became "Walker's Ferry". Young Walker stayed and prospered, operating this busy ferry to the end of the century. In 1904, industrialist CC Worthington purchased the land on both sides of the river and the ferry continued crossing the river here, but as Worthington's private chauffeur-driven source of transportation, not as public transportation. Eventually, the ferry fell into disrepair and operation stopped.

Durham Boats on the Delaware Prior to the expansion of our highway system, Durham Boats were used to transport goods such as flour, corn or pig iron to Philadelphia. The Durham boat moved swiftly downstream with the current, aided by a pair of 18 foot oars and a 25 to 30 foot long sweep to steer through the rapids. When rigged with a 30-foot mast and triangular sail, this vessel was said to have moved silently and gracefully downstream. These crafts were able to travel down the 100 Shawnee Inn Drive, Shawnee on Delaware, Pennsylvania 18356 800-SHAWNEE (742-9633)

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river through its many shallows because when fully loaded, they drew only about 24 inches of water. They were able to travel against the current and through the treacherous rapids up the Delaware River because when partially loaded with a cargo of about 2 tons, they drew only about 3 inches of water. The Durham boat played a large role in Washington’s crossing of the Delaware. Shawnee River and Guided Fishing Trips Housed in the white building opposite the River Sanctuary, are our river operations. In keeping with the tradition of using the water for transportation and recreation, The Shawnee Inn and Golf Resort still operates a canoe, raft and kayak livery for guests to enjoy the beauty and majesty of the river. As many generations have explored the Delaware River over the centuries, our certified fishing guides help many guests navigate the river and catch many of the species of fish that are indigenous to this region. Walk up the black topped drive towards the main parking area for the Shawnee Inn and Golf Resort. Once you reach the brick path, turn right towards the tennis courts and children’s playground. Walk just in front of the two cottages. This is Stop B.

100 Shawnee Inn Drive, Shawnee on Delaware, Pennsylvania 18356 800-SHAWNEE (742-9633)

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STOP B Since Shawnee opened as a resort in 1911 (the Buckwood Inn), the land surrounding the Inn has been used for a variety of activities. The Cottages Take a look at the two cottages, each has had several uses over the decades in which Shawnee has been open. Originally private residences for the Bryant and Cullen families, these cottages became the recreation center for the resort. Throughout the 70’s and 80’s many tennis racquets, basketballs and organized activities passed through these doors. Just after the turn of the century (that’s 1900’s to 2000’s) the Inn turned these two cottages into guest rooms for the resort. In 2007, these cottages were upgraded and named the Sycamore and Cedar. They became part of our Legacy Collection, a new standard in luxury accommodations in the Pocono Mountains.

100 Shawnee Inn Drive, Shawnee on Delaware, Pennsylvania 18356 800-SHAWNEE (742-9633)

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The Driving Range Directly opposite the cottages is our driving range. When this resort opened as The Buckwood Inn in 1911, the area that you see in front of you was grass tennis courts. These courts were used for the enjoyment and entertainment of the guests at Shawnee through the 30’s. In the early 50’s, the driving range was created and Shawnee became the home to “Swing’s the Thing” golf school. Golf professionals Harry Obitz, Dick Farley and Rick McCord taught many a golfer and entertained many guests with their golf swing demonstrations from the serious to the silly. Though still used as a driving range today, it doubles as an approach course in the evening because it is lit for night play. Tom Doak designed our approach course where each set of greens and bunkering are modeled after famous Tillinghast holes. Continue along red brick path towards the villa’s that are straight ahead. Just past the gate, take the road to the right and stay by the river. Fairway Village To your left is Fairway Village. This village housed the first timeshare units built at Shawnee in the early 1970’s. This timeshare village is one of 10 separate villages owned and operated by Wyndham. Walk down the road by the river and pass the first street on your left and go through the barricade. Stop at the next road. The street you are standing on is Minisink Ave. 100 Shawnee Inn Drive, Shawnee on Delaware, Pennsylvania 18356 800-SHAWNEE (742-9633)

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STOP C You are standing on the edge of the Village of Shawnee on Delaware. This village was founded in the early 1700’s. The street you are standing on, Minisink Avenue, has been a part of this village for over 200 years. Close your eyes and imagine horse drawn carriages and later Model T’s driving on this road. Continue along the river through the other set of barricades and follow the path veering left when the path turns. When you pass through the next set of small barricades, turn right and walk through Depuy Village until you come to a large building on the right. This is Fort Depuy.

100 Shawnee Inn Drive, Shawnee on Delaware, Pennsylvania 18356 800-SHAWNEE (742-9633)

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STOP D In 1725, prior to the American Revolution, Nicholas Depuy moved to Shawnee from New Amsterdam (New York) and in 1733 built Fort Depuy, a distinctive, stone home that later served as a Fort in The French and Indian War. Benjamin Franklin was authorized to supervise the construction of a line of forts on the Northwestern side of the Kittatinny range in 1756. Out of the five he constructed, this is the only one that stands today. Today, Fort Depuy houses the offices for Shawnee Development, Inc. Return the way you came and walk until the road turns to the right. Go right and follow the road until it intersects with River Road. As you walk look at the timeshare units. These have been part of the timeshare business at Shawnee since the late 1970’s. As you approach River Road, look to your right and you will see a large home with a gated backyard.

100 Shawnee Inn Drive, Shawnee on Delaware, Pennsylvania 18356 800-SHAWNEE (742-9633)

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STOP E This is now the Gatehouse Bed and Breakfast. It was originally constructed as a carriage house in 1909 for Fort DePuy, and the property was soon turned into a resort by C.C. Worthington. In the late 1940s, Waring purchased the Buckwood Inn and renamed it Shawnee Inn, and then transformed this Carriage House into a 7,000-square-foot summer home. This was Fred Waring’s Home until the late 1970’s. Turn to River Road or walk a bit towards it if you are not close enough. Look across the road and just over the embankment. You may see the steeple.

100 Shawnee Inn Drive, Shawnee on Delaware, Pennsylvania 18356 800-SHAWNEE (742-9633)

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STOP F Just past the small incline is the Shawnee Presbyterian Church. The original stone foundation for this church was laid in 1752. The initials of the men responsible for the building of the church, together with the date, are still to be seen on the foundation of the present structure. They are N.D.P. (Nicholas DePuy), S.D.P. (Samuel DePuy) and A.V.K. (Abraham Van Kampen). The present structure was erected on the stone foundation in 1853. The burial ground around the church is also very old. Some of the stones are almost undecipherable but among the first interments was that of Samuel DePuy who died June 15, 1766, and is one of those buried beneath the present pulpit. Turn left on River Road and stay close to the edge. Walk to Minisink Avenue, turn left and cross the street into the large parking lot. Walk straight through the parking lot to the large building you see and walk around to the right in front of the building.

(alternately if you do not want to walk on River Road, turn around and walk back through Depuy Village go straight where the road turn and go through the barricades. Follow this path around to the right and turn right at the next street you come to.

100 Shawnee Inn Drive, Shawnee on Delaware, Pennsylvania 18356 800-SHAWNEE (742-9633)

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This is Minisink Avenue. Take Minisink Ave and just before you reach River Road you will see a large parking lot on the left. Turn into the parking lot and walk straight through the parking lot to the large building you see and walk around to the right in front of the building. Stop G This is Worthington Hall, home of The Shawnee Playhouse. Worthington Hall was constructed in 1904; it was bequeathed to the village of Shawnee by CC Worthington as a place for entertainment and education for the residents and visitors of Shawnee on Delaware. It has been used for just that, and when Fred Waring owned the resort, he broadcast his famous radio shows from here. Today, it is still used for the entertainment and education of residents and visitors alike. Musicals, plays, and children’s shows still grace this stage all year round. Continue past The Shawnee Playhouse to the end of the drive and Worthington Avenue.

STOP H

100 Shawnee Inn Drive, Shawnee on Delaware, Pennsylvania 18356 800-SHAWNEE (742-9633)

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Diagonally across the street is now Shawnee Falls Studio. This residence is reported to be the oldest home in Monroe County--older than Presidents Washington and Jefferson’s homes. Further up River Road is the Shawnee General Store and Atlantic Gas Station. The store was built in 1859 by John Depui Lebar and his wife Sara. It has remained open as a general store since that date. Turn left and walk approximately three houses down and stand in front of the Shawnee Gallery. STOP I In front of you is now the home of the Shawnee Gallery. Originally this home was constructed as a location for the wives of the farmers who worked this land to sell their crafts. A basket unique to this valley, the Shawnee basket or Lenape basket was made in this location. The home to the right is a private residence now, but when Worthington owned and operated the resort, it served as a tea house for guests of the resort. The home on the left, now a private residence, was the location of a bird aviary and small zoo during the years Worthington owned the resort. Continue down Worthington Avenue. You will see a set of garages on the right. Walk into the parking area and through the arch with the stone pillars. STOP J In front of you is Worthington. These luxury accommodations were recently constructed on the site of what was known as the Fairway House. This house and many other houses in this village were (and 100 Shawnee Inn Drive, Shawnee on Delaware, Pennsylvania 18356 800-SHAWNEE (742-9633)

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still are) private residences. For any Captain Kangaroo Fans (originally aired from 1955 to 1982), Mr. Green Jeans lived directly across the street from Worthington.

Take the red brick path to the right. As you reach the road you will see a path on the other side of the road. Take that path. Follow this path through the buildings and around on the end of the driving range. After the driving range bear to the left and follow it to the main road leading to the Inn. Follow the main road around to the front of the Inn. STOP K The Shawnee Inn and Golf Resort has a rich history. The Veranda you see that stretched across the front of the Inn, used to stretch around the sides as well. This Inn opened in May of 1911 and has been serving guests ever since. Please read the following brief history at your leisure. This concludes your walking tour. 100 Shawnee Inn Drive, Shawnee on Delaware, Pennsylvania 18356 800-SHAWNEE (742-9633)

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History of the Resort C.C. Worthington Comes to Shawnee In the late 1890’s a native New Yorker and successful business owner, Charles Campbell Worthington, took up summer residence in Shawnee. C.C. Worthington was an engineer and inventor by trade. Worthington had always been an outdoorsman and never enjoyed urban living. He decided to move to Shawnee where his summer home, Buckwood Park, was located. Worthington Makes His Mark on Shawnee On the Pennsylvania side in the village of Shawnee, Mr. Worthington built two parallel streets running from the river inland and named them Worthington and Minisink avenues. These streets still exist today. Fort Depuy was renovated and converted into a home for his family. Worthington also began operating the ferry, now known as Walker’s Ferry, in 1903. Construction of Worthington Hall (home of the Shawnee Playhouse) began in 1904. Worthington’s Dream Become Reality In the early 1900’s, Mr. Worthington began to implement plans for building his dream, an exclusive resort hotel. Worthington decided to build a hotel of unique design with floors and walls made of 12 inch concrete reinforced with iron and disregarded the traditional construction of resort hotels in the area which were all made of wood and highly flammable.

100 Shawnee Inn Drive, Shawnee on Delaware, Pennsylvania 18356 800-SHAWNEE (742-9633)

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What Made Worthington’s Resort Special Worthington wanted to make this resort, named the Buckwood Inn, one of the most attractive establishments in the East. The buildings and grounds were especially designed to blend with the natural environment. The decor of the Inn reflected his discriminating taste and attention to detail. The food served in the dining room was produced fresh from gardens on the premises as well as nearby farms. There was a creamery, which provided fresh clean milk, cream and butter. The drinking water, of the purest quality, was gravity fed directly into each room from Sunfish Pond, located directly across the river in Buckwood Park (One can still hike to Sunfish Pond via the nearby Appalachian Trail). Worthington’s Gem Worthington hired orchestras to play every afternoon and Sunday evening. Guests could take the Ferry across the Delaware River to the New Jersey side, to visit Buckwood Park, a private park and wildlife sanctuary. In and around Shawnee Village, areas were set aside for target shooting, a small petting zoo, an aviary and a teahouse. But, the single most remarkable attraction was his meticulously planned golf course, which swiftly became known as the Gem of the East. Mr. Worthington hired the famous A.W. Tillinghast to design the 18-hole course on Shawnee Island.

100 Shawnee Inn Drive, Shawnee on Delaware, Pennsylvania 18356 800-SHAWNEE (742-9633)

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Maintaining His Gem Worthington realized that this course must be properly maintained and originally employed a Scotsman with a flock of sheep and dogs to keep the fairways trim. The experiment failed, and turning his mind towards mechanical methods to solving the mowing problem, he invented the first commercially successful gang mower for maintaining putting surfaces and fairways. The response to his invention was so unexpectedly great that he founded the Shawnee Mower Factory and soon sold mowers all over the United States. Making Golf History In 1912, C.C. Worthington invited a group of professional golfers to be his guests at the Buckwood Inn. It is said, that this meeting led to the formation of the present day PGA and the first PGA Championships. Twenty-six years later, in 1938, Shawnee hosted the PGA Championships. In this match, Sam Snead, Shawnee’s Touring Pro at the time, narrowly lost to Paul Runyon. Throughout the early years of the Inn, many famous golfers played the now famous private island course.

100 Shawnee Inn Drive, Shawnee on Delaware, Pennsylvania 18356 800-SHAWNEE (742-9633)

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Times They Are A Changing…and so does the Owner After World War I, the great depression occurred and this brought changes to the vacation industry. Guests were no longer summer visitors who stayed for two or three month periods. With the wide use of the automobile, they became tourists who only stayed a week or two. The Inn was a seasonal operation, only open in the summer, and this meant the revenue generated was grossly inadequate for proper maintenance. The Inn fell into disrepair and the number of guests dwindled significantly. In 1943, a year before C.C. died at the age of 91, he finally allowed his family to sell the Inn. The Buckwood Inn was sold to Manawalamink, Inc, a corporation headed by famous choral master, Fred Waring. Mr. Waring renamed the resort and so it became the Shawnee Inn. Fred Waring Embraces Shawnee Inn Despite the fact that seasonal resorts seemed economically unviable, Fred Waring was determined to maintain Shawnee’s status as a seasonal, expensive and exclusive establishment. 100 Shawnee Inn Drive, Shawnee on Delaware, Pennsylvania 18356 800-SHAWNEE (742-9633)

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In order to promote his image, which was the most valuable asset for the Inn’s success, Waring centered all his musical activities on Shawnee Inn itself. He created, rehearsed and broadcasted his famous radio programs from the stage of Worthington Hall throughout the 1950’s, and Fred Waring and his Pennsylvanians became household words throughout the country. Waring and Golf Mr. Waring was an enthusiastic golfer. Shawnee was the best of both worlds for him as he could enjoy his favorite game, golf, and continue to be active in the entertainment world. Fred Waring had many celebrity friends that visited Shawnee including Bob Hope, Art Carney, George Goebel, Arnold Palmer, Lucille Ball, Ed Sullivan, Eddie Fisher, Perry Como, President Dwight D. Eisenhower, but none caught Waring’s enthusiasm for golf like Jackie Gleason. In 1959, Jackie attempted his first game of golf scoring a 143. However, only 15 months later, with practice and lessons, Jackie Gleason shot an amazing 75. It was during the time of Fred Warings ownership, that Bill Diddle, golf architect, helped turn Shawnee’s 18 holes into 27. More Changes…and another Owner The seasonal resort industry was changing further. The affluent Americans that once flocked to Shawnee, could now fly and vacation anywhere in the world. They could also see Fred Waring’s group in these locations as well as on television. Fred Waring realized he could no longer devote the time and energy necessary to 100 Shawnee Inn Drive, Shawnee on Delaware, Pennsylvania 18356 800-SHAWNEE (742-9633)

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keep the Inn operating according to his high standards. He decided to sell the Inn and the surrounding area to Karl Hope in 1974. Shawnee Had A Brief, But Eventful Time with Hope Mr. Hope, a real estate developer, was determined to turn the Inn into a profitable business. He experimented with a new concept, resort timesharing. In 1975 he opened Shawnee Village, the first timesharing development in the state and one of the first in the country. The timesharing experiment meant that Shawnee Inn, which had been mostly exclusive, was now open to a much wider segment of the population. To achieve year round status he hired Jean Claude Kiley, a triple gold medal Olympic skier, to run the operations for Shawnee Mountain. In 1977, after completing Depuy and Fairway Villages, Mr. Hope sold his business interests to the current owners, Charles and Ginny Kirkwood and their family. Kirkwood’s Make Changes to Brighten Shawnee’s Future To ensure that Shawnee would be a cost effective year-round resort, he contracted Dick Farley and “Swing’s the Thing” Golf School to continue at Shawnee, built an indoor pool, miniature golf course, driving range and opened Shawnee River Adventures on the beautiful Delaware River. Improvements were also made at 100 Shawnee Inn Drive, Shawnee on Delaware, Pennsylvania 18356 800-SHAWNEE (742-9633)

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Shawnee Mountain with the addition of 100% snow making capabilities and the construction of Shawnee Place, a recreational water park for young children. In addition, the Kirkwood’s renovated Worthington Hall and began productions at what is now known as Shawnee Playhouse. Professional actors from New York and beyond were auditioned and performed shows May through December. They introduced weekly free concerts to the public on the front lawn of the Inn that continue to be a favorite activity at Shawnee.

Timesharing and the Inn Separate In 1991, Shawnee divided into three separate companies: Shawnee Properties, responsible for managing and marketing the timesharing; Shawnee Mountain, responsible for managing the ski area; and the Inn. In 1994, the Kirkwoods renamed it The Shawnee Inn and Golf Resort. What the New Millennium Has Brought The Shawnee Inn and Golf Resort has embraced its history and taken a new direction in marketing and guest service levels all while enjoying its unique location - this majestic Inn on the banks of the Delaware River. Returning to its roots in golf, Shawnee opened the Tillinghast Golf Academy; and its state-of-the-art golf practice facility. The Red Brick House that was built in 1752 and stands near the entrance of the Inn was renovated to serve as the home of The Tillinghast Academy and its practice facility. Recently, Sam Snead's Tavern opened near the academy adding a unique fine dining experience for the guests of the Inn.

100 Shawnee Inn Drive, Shawnee on Delaware, Pennsylvania 18356 800-SHAWNEE (742-9633)

ShawneeInn.com

The Future of Shawnee The history of Shawnee is very important to us and we love to share it with our guests. We are reminded of our roots and what has been accomplished here. We pride ourselves on this history and we look forward to a future of ongoing excellence in world-class golf, fine entertainment, and a unique, memorable experience for visitors here in the beautiful village of Shawnee on Delaware, Pennsylvania. The History of Golf at Shawnee In the late 1800’s, a wealthy businessman, Charles Campbell Worthington, walked the beautiful land he had recently purchased. The breathtaking views, one-of-a-kind location and natural beauty were overwhelming. It was this walk that began his plans for what would become the Shawnee Inn and Golf Resort. Part of CC Worthington’s plan was to create a world-class golf course, a course that would be carved into the natural surroundings to compliment the splendor of this unique location. His choice of golf architect was AW Tillinghast. At the time, Tillinghast was a little known American golf architect and a personal friend of CC Worthington. In 1907, Tillinghast began to layout this challenging course. Tillinghast’s trademark on many of the courses he designed use turf, sand and contours devilishly combined to demand the most from a golfer's intellect and abilities. In his career, a number of his most beautiful holes were the result of the struggle between man, dirt and rock. His design at Shawnee was no different. Tillinghast’s design of this famous island golf course was his first, but definitely not his last. Tillinghast went on to design many famous course including: Wing Foot, Baltusrol, Beth Page Black, San Francisco Bay Club and others. 100 Shawnee Inn Drive, Shawnee on Delaware, Pennsylvania 18356 800-SHAWNEE (742-9633)

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CC Worthington’s dedication to the game of golf continued. In many ways the PGA may have actually had its origins at Shawnee. In 1911, the resort's owner, C.C. Worthington, staged a professional tournament to gain recognition for the sport. Shortly thereafter the PGA was formally founded and one of its first events was and still is the Shawnee Open. Two-time defending US Open Champion John McDermott won the tournament in 1913. Shawnee was on the golf map and began to gain recognition as a championship course. In 1938, Shawnee hosted the PGA Championship and our touring professional, Sam Snead, lost to Paul Runyan 8 and 7 - an interesting finish which is immortalized on film. Virtually all the golf greats during the first half of the 20th Century played at Shawnee including Walter Hagen, Lawson Little, Long Jim Barnes and Johnny Farrell. In fact, six former Shawnee Open winners also hold U.S. Open titles. In 1943, Fred Waring, a famous band leader bought the Shawnee Inn and Golf Resort. Mr. Waring was an enthusiastic golfer. Shawnee was the best of both worlds for him as he could enjoy his favorite game, golf, and continue to be active in the entertainment world. Fred Waring had many celebrity friends that visited Shawnee including Bob Hope, Art Carney, George Goebel, Arnold Palmer, Lucille Ball, Ed Sullivan, Eddie Fisher, Perry Como, President Dwight D. Eisenhower, but none caught Waring’s enthusiasm for golf like Jackie Gleason. In 1959, Jackie attempted his first game of golf scoring a 143. However, only 15 months later, with practice and lessons, Jackie Gleason shot an amazing 75. It was during the time of Fred Warings ownership, that Bill Diddle, golf architect, helped turn Shawnee’s 18 holes into 27. 100 Shawnee Inn Drive, Shawnee on Delaware, Pennsylvania 18356 800-SHAWNEE (742-9633)

ShawneeInn.com

Fred Waring continued Shawnee’s legacy of golf championships when they hosted the 1967 NCAA Championships. Hale Irwin, one of golf's premier players, won that championship. The golf history at Shawnee is rich. The Shawnee Inn and Golf Resort has embraced this history. Returning to its roots in golf, Shawnee opened the Tillinghast Golf Academy; and it’s state-of-theart golf practice facility. The Red Brick House that was built in 1752 and stands near the entrance of the Inn was renovated to serve as the home of The Tillinghast Academy and its practice facility. Recently, Sam Snead's Tavern opened near the academy adding a unique fine dining and gallery of Sam Snead memorabilia experience for the guests of the Inn. Shawnee recently opened our nine-hole golf facility, the Tillinghast Approach Course. Lighted for night play, the 9 holes at the approach course are modeled after the greens and bunkering from other famous Tillinghast designed golf courses including the San Francisco Golf Club, Winged Foot and Baltusrol. To this day, the Shawnee Open is still a sanctioned point tournament for the Philadelphia Section PGA. The Shawnee Inn and Golf Resort, embracing our past, to create our future. Please feel free to roam our halls and view some of this history for yourself.

100 Shawnee Inn Drive, Shawnee on Delaware, Pennsylvania 18356 800-SHAWNEE (742-9633)

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