NEW PSAT STRATEGICS AND PRACTICES By: Dr. S. L. Sherrill, Mrs. Deim, Mrs. Canady

January 4, 2018 | Author: Colleen Stafford | Category: N/A
Share Embed Donate


Short Description

1 NEW PSAT STRATEGICS AND PRACTICES By: Dr. S. L. Sherrill, Mrs. Deim, Mrs. Canady2 PROGRAM: 6:00-6:50 6:50-7:00 7:10-7:...

Description

NEW  PSAT  STRATEGICS  AND  PRACTICES   By:  Dr.  S.  L.  Sherrill,  Mrs.  Deim,  Mrs.  Canady    

PROGRAM:     6:00-­‐6:50  

6:50-­‐7:00     7:10-­‐7:50     7:50-­‐8:00     8:00-­‐9:00    

 INTRODUCTION:  Dr.  Sherrill   •  READING  SECTION  STRATEGIES   •  WRITING  AND  LANGUAGE  SECTION  STRATEGIES     •  MATH  SECTIONS  STRATEGIES      BREAK    READING,  WRITING,  AND  LANGUAGE  PRACTICUM:  Mrs.  Canady    BREAK    MATH  PRACTICUM:    Mrs.  Deim  

KEY  TO  THE  PSAT:     The  most  important  PSAT  strategy  is  to  really  focus  on  FULLY  UNDERSTANDING   the  quesQons.    The  test  is  more  about  your  thought  process  than  about  how   much  you  know.    So  if  you  think  through  what  the  quesQons  are  asking  and  set   them  up  well,  you  will  do  fine.    

WHAT  IS  THE  PSAT?     It  is  a  preliminary  SAT  that  is  used  for  assessing  student  academic   progress  and  determining  eligibility  for  the  NaQonal  Merit  Scholarship   compeQQon.    

PSAT  FORMAT:     There  are  four  secQons:     1  Reading  Test:  60  minutes,  47  quesQons,  5  passages     2  WriJng  And  Language  Test:    35  minutes,  44  quesQons,  4  passages     3  Math  Test—No  calculator:  25  minutes,  17  quesQons  (13  mulQple   choice  and  4  grid-­‐in)     4  Math  Test—Calculator  PermiQed:    45  minutes,  31  quesQons,  (27   mulQple  choice,  4  grid-­‐in)        

OLD  AND  NEW  PSAT  DIFFERENCES:      

WHAT  TO  DO  BEFORE  THE  PSAT?     1.  Go  to  bed  at  a  reasonable  hour  starQng  a  week  before  the  test.         2.  Know  the  test  direcQons—you  don’t  want  to  waste  Qme  reading  the  direcQons   on  each  secQon.     3.  Know  that  you  should  include  an  answer  for  every  quesQon  since  there  is  no   penalty.         4.  Become  comfortable  with  Qming.    Do  at  least  some  pracQce  with  Qming  so  you   will  not  work  too  quickly  or  too  slowly  on  test  day.    

WHAT  SHOULD  I  BRING  TO  THE  PSAT?     1.  A  scienQfic  or  graphing  calculator   www.collegeboard.org/psat-­‐nmsqt/approved-­‐calculators.     2.  Several  sharpened  number  2  pencils     3.  A  watch  to  monitor  your  pacing  (one  that  doesn’t  make  noise)     4.  Have  an  email  address  you  can  use  to  receive  informaQon  from   colleges,  and  enter  it  on  the  PSAT.     5.  Use  the  restroom  before  the  test  starts  and  have  a  snack  and  water   boale  so  you  do  not  waste  Qme  during  the  test.    

READING  SECTION   STRATEGIES    

KNOW  THE  MAKEUP  OF  THE  READING  SECTION:     •  60  minutes  long   •  47  quesQons   •  5  passages  total:  1  literature  passage,  2  history/social  science  passages,  2  science   passages   •  One  of  the  passages  will  be  comprised  of  two  smaller  passages  that  you  will  need  to   compare/contrast  in  the  quesQons   •  1-­‐2  graphs  accompanying  the  reading  that  you  will  need  to  analyze   •  The  quesQons  for  a  given  passage  generally  go  in  order  of  where  the  material  is  found  in   the  passage  (e.g.,  quesQon  1  is  about  lines  1-­‐5,  quesQon  2  is  about  lines  6-­‐9,  etc.)   •  The  quesQons  are  in  random  order  of  difficulty    

READING  SECTION  TEST-­‐TAKING  STRATEGIES:     1.  Take  your  Jme.    Read  the  passages  well  and  think  through  the  quesJons  carefully.     2.  Remember  there  is  no  penalty  to  guess.     3.  Read  the  passages  before  answering  the  quesJons  (helps  understand  the  meaning  of   the  passage).   •  Peruse  the  quesQons   •  Read  the  passage  well  (inference,  tone,  purpose,  suggesQon,  funcQon,  etc.)   •  Answer  the  quesQons  carefully    

READING  SECTION  TEST-­‐TAKING  STRATEGIES:     4.  Focus  on  the  overall  meaning  of  the  passage(s)  as  you  read.     •  Read  the  Literature  passage’s  first  paragraph  more  carefully  and  the  rest  normally.   •  Read  the  Non-­‐FicQon  passage  (history/social  science)  reading  the  first  paragraph,   the  first  sentence  of  each  paragraph,  and  the  last  paragraph  carefully,  and  read  the   rest  normally.  Note  the  criQcal  informaQon.   •  Read  the  Dual  Passage  with  the  focus  on  the  overall  meaning,  but  pay  close   aaenQon  to  the  overall  relaQonship  between  the  two  passages.    Look  for  similariQes   or  differences  between  the  two.    

READING  SECTION  TEST-­‐TAKING  STRATEGIES:     5.  Do  not  hesitate  to  skip  and  come  back  to  quesJons.   •  First  quesQons  of  passage  will  usually  have  the  overall  meaning.    If  you  don’t  grasp  it,   go  to  the  other  quesQons  and  come  back.       6.  Cover  the  answers  as  you  read  the  quesJons.   •  Remember  to  have  perused  the  quesQons  prior  to  reading.     7.  Underline  and  circle  key  words  as  you  read.   •  Read  carefully  the  first  Qme  circling  key  words  (not,  primary,  infer,  suggest,  etc.).    

READING  SECTION  TEST-­‐TAKING  STRATEGIES:       8.     Create  your  own  general  answer  by  considering  the  context.   •  Read,  paraphrase  (put  in  your  own  words)  what  you  read.    What  is  the  broad  idea?     Will  help  with  answering  the  quesQons.     9.     Do  not  hesitate  to  refer  back  to  the  passage  (open  book  test).     10.     The  answers  will  be  100%  correct  or  100%  wrong.   •  Look  not  for  the  best  answer  but  the  flawless  answer.   •  Look  for  correctness.     11.     Focus  on  meaning,  not  on  matching.   •  Don’t  choose  answer  because  it  uses  similar  ure  it  is  the  correct  idea.      

READING  SECTION  TEST-­‐TAKING  STRATEGIES:     12.     Determine  word  definiJons  based  on  context  clues.   •  The  sentence  compleQon  in  the  old  PSAT  is  found  in  the  Reading  Test.    While   vocabulary  is  important,  pracQce  picking  upon  meaning  of  words  based  on  the   context     13.     Just  because  you  do  not  know  a  word’s  meaning  does  not  mean  it  is  wrong.   •  If  you  have  a  word  that  sort  of  works  and  one  you  do  not  know,  go  with  the  word   you  do  not  know  since  it  has  the  potenQal  of  being  100%  correct.     14.     When  in  doubt,  give  the  PSAT  the  benefit  of  the  doubt.   •  This  is  a  well-­‐constructed  assessment.    Don’t  waste  Qme  looking  for  flaws.        

WRITING  &  LANGUAGE   SECTION  STRATEGIES    

KNOW  THE  MAKEUP  OF  THE     WRITING  &  LANGUAGE  SECTION:    

•  •  •  •  •   

1  secQon   35  minutes  long   4  passages   11  quesQons  per  passage,  with  44  quesQons  total   QuesQons  are  in  a  random  order  of  difficulty  

WRITING  &  LANGUAGE     TEST-­‐TAKING  STRATEGIES:     1.  Take  your  Qme.    Be  thorough.     2.  Pace  yourself  to  finish  when  Qme  is  called.     3.  Underline  and  circle  key  informaQon  as  you  read  long  quesQons  (one  word   omiaed  and  you  miss  the  point).     4.  Try  to  hear  as  you  read  by  silently  mouthing  things.    

WRITING  &  LANGUAGE     TEST-­‐TAKING  STRATEGIES:     5.  Think  about  the  meaning.    Many  Qmes,  the  issue  is  punctuaQon  and  subject-­‐verb   agreement.     6.  Consider  relevant  context.    See  the  bigger  picture  like  tense  agreement  or  tone   consistency.     7.  With  about  9  minutes  per  passage,  you  have  Qme.     8.  Try  to  create  your  own  answer  before  looking  at  the  choices.     9.  Do  not  hesitate  to  come  back  to  answers  to  quesQons.    You  can  skip  quesQons  and   come  back.    

WRITING  &  LANGUAGE     TEST-­‐TAKING  STRATEGIES:     10.     Use  similariJes  among  answers  to  eliminate  choices  (Ex.    A.  AddiJonally,  B.  Also,  C.   In  Contrast,  D.  Moreover).     11.     If  you  must  guess,  be  smart  about  it.    Remember  “No  Penalty.”   •  SomeQmes  a  few  of  the  same  answer  choices  are  used  in  a  row.    Do  avoid  picking   an  answer  choice  simply  because  it  was  in  a  previous  quesQon.   •  “No  Change”  has  just  as  much  a  chance  of  being  correct  as  other  opQons.   •  QuesQons  do  not  have  tricks  or  gimmicks  (ex.  shorter  answer).   •  Once  you  have  a  thoughoul  decision,  don’t  second-­‐guess  you  answer.     12.     Realize  that  these  are  grammar  rules,  not  merely  preferences.        

KEY  GRAMMAR  CONCEPTS     (See  A&achment  for  Details)     1.  Sentence  Basics   2.  Sentence  Fragment       3.  Sentence  Flow  and  Structure      

MATH     SECTION  STRATEGIES    

KNOW  THE  MAKEUP  OF  THE     MATH  SECTIONS:    

•  The  new  PSAT  Math  Test  is  composed  of  TWO  subsecQons     •  One  secQon  is  a  45-­‐minute  calculator  permiaed  secQon,  consisQng  of  31  quesQons   total  (27  mulQple  choice  and  4  grid-­‐ins.     •  One  secQon  is  a  25-­‐minute  no  calculator  permiaed  secQon,  consisQng  of  17   quesQons  total  (13  mulQple  choice  and  2  grid-­‐ins.     •  The  quesQons  generally  become  more  difficult  as  you  go  through  the  secQon.      

MATH  SECTIONS     TEST-­‐TAKING  STRATEGIES:     1.  The  math  secQons  are  more  straighoorward  than  it  used  to  be.    All  drawings  are   to  scale  unless  they  state  otherwise.    You  can  answer  every  quesQon  since  there   is  no  penalty  for  guessing.    You  can  spend  more  Qne  thinking  through  problems   instead  of  playing  mind  games.     2.  The  math  secQons  are  curved,  so  do  you  best  to  keep  levelheaded.    This  is  the   first  year  of  the  new  PSAT  so  they  will  curve  it;  so  no  maaer  how  challenging  or   less  challenging  it  may  be,  keep  a  level  head.     3.  Don’t  overthink  the  quesQons,  especially  at  the  beginning  of  each  secQon.    You   do  not  need  higher-­‐order  math  to  solve  the  quesQons.    You  need  a  firm   grounding  in  the  basics.        

MATH  SECTIONS     TEST-­‐TAKING  STRATEGIES:     4.  Rely  more  on  your  thinking,  less  on  your  knowledge.    Do  not  respond  quickly  because   you  were  never  officially  taught  the  concept.    Use  your  intuiQon  and  reasoning  to  think   through  the  problems.    Your  job  is  to  get  the  right  answer,  not  explain  your  thought   processes  to  someone  else.     5.  Do  not  push  through  the  secQon.    The  PSAT  is  easier  to  finish.    PracQce  pacing  on  the   pracQce  math  tests  given.         6.  Instead  of  rushing  through  the  quesQons,  second-­‐guessing  yourself,  and  having  to   spend  Qme  double-­‐checking,  focus  on  doing  the  quesQons  one  Qme  well.        

MATH  SECTIONS     TEST-­‐TAKING  STRATEGIES:       7.  Focus  on  what  the  quesQon  is  asking.    Underline  and  circle  key  words  as  you  go  to   ensure  you  do  not  miss  anything  important.    Pay  aaenQon  to  the  quesQon.  Don’t   get  tunnel  vision  and  tune  out  vital  facts.     8.  Approach  the  quesQons  like  a  puzzle,  not  like  a  typical  school  math  problem.     Challenging  quesQons  require  long  calculaQons.         9.  Do  not  jump  to  an  answer  too  quickly.      On  the  new  PSAT,  incorrect  answers  are   carefully  designed  to  be  answers  to  the  most  likely  ways  of  incorrectly  solving  the   problems.    

MATH  SECTIONS     TEST-­‐TAKING  STRATEGIES:       10. Write  out  your  work.    Don’t  do  in  head  but  write  problems  out.    The  more  you  write,   the  more  likely  the  answer  will  be  correct.    Don’t  make  careless  mistakes.     11. Don’t  overuse  the  calculator.      There  is  a  whole  secQon  that  you  cannot  use  the   calculator.    Many  of  the  answers  to  the  problems  will  keep  radicals  and  fracQons  in   their  nondecimal  form.    So  calculaQng  too  far  ahead  could  set  you  behind.    Use  when   necessary.    However,  rely  on  your  criQcal  thinking  first    and  on  your  calculator   second.    

MATH  SECTIONS     TEST-­‐TAKING  STRATEGIES:       12. Use  the  choices  to  sharpen  your  thinking.    Don’t  jump  to  an  answer  prematurely  or   eliminate  answers  too  quickly,  but  examine  all  answers.    Be  open  to  plugging   numbers  back  into  the  expressions  when  possible.    StarQng  with  choices  B  or  C   since  choices  are  typically  arranged  from  small  to  large  can  save  Qme.    Looking  at   the  answer  choices  may  help  develop  a  sense  of  what  the  quesQon  is  asking.     13. Math  problems  will  not  require  a  great  number  of  steps  so  don’t  make  simple   mistakes.    

MATH  SECTIONS     TEST-­‐TAKING  STRATEGIES:       14. Careless  mistakes  are  sQll  mistakes.      Make  careless  mistakes  on  easier  problems   may  be  more  detrimental  than  having  conceptual  difficulQes  on  a  challenging   quesQon.     15. Come  back  to  quesQons  you  do  not  understand.    Do  not  underesQmate  the   power  of  your  subconscious  mind  to  work  through  a  previous  problem  while   your  conscious  mind  is  focused  on  a  different  problem.    If  you  can’t  get  a   problem,  circle  and  come  back.    

MATH  SECTIONS     TEST-­‐TAKING  STRATEGIES:       16. Give  the  quesQons  the  benefit  of  the  doubt.    Do  not  assume  that  it  is  unfair  or  a   stupid  quesQon.    Try  to  reexamine  your  understanding  of  the  quesQon.     17. Be  prepared  for  the  unexpected.    Since  this  test  your  ability  to  think  criQcally,  do   not  let  unusual  quesQons  surprise  you.         18. What  about  the  addiQonal  topics  in  math?    Unless  you  are  aiming  for  a  perfect   score,  the  PSAT  has  only  two  quesQons  from  this  wildcard  series  of  topics.        

MATH  CONCEPTS  YOU  MUST  KNOW:     1.  Use  subsQtuQon  to  solve  equaQons.     2.  Uses  eliminaQon  to  solve  equaQons.       3.  Use  the  quadraQc  formula  to  solve  an  equaQon.   4.  Use  factoring  to  simplify  expressions.       5.  Know  common  factoring  paaerns.    

MATH  CONCEPTS  YOU  MUST  KNOW:     6.  Know  how  to  determine  slope-­‐intercept  form.     7.  Know  how  to  determine  slope  formula,  posiQve  and  negaQve  correlaQons.     8.  Know  how  use  linear,  quadraQc,  and  exponenQal  models  to  interpret  funcQons.       9.  Percentages         10. RaQos  and  ProporQons      

MATH  CONCEPTS  YOU  MUST  KNOW:     11.     Unit  Conversion   12.     ScienQfic  NotaQon     13.     InequaliQes     14.     Exponents   15.     Absolute  Value    

MATH  CONCEPTS  YOU  MUST  KNOW:     16.     Probability  Basics   17.     Independent/Dependent  CounQng  Problems     18.     Distance,  Rate,  Time       19.     Measures  of  Center     20.     Range  and  Standard  DeviaQon    

MATH  CONCEPTS  YOU  MUST  KNOW:     21.     Margin  of  Error  and  Confidence  Intervals   22.     FuncQon  SoluQons   23.     Imaginary  Numbers   24.     Sine,  Cosine,  Tangent   25.     Circle  Formula   26.     Miscellaneous  Geometry  and  Trigonometry    

PSAT  PRACTICE  TEST  #1     Copy  and  paste  this  address  in  your  browser  for  PSAT  Test  #1  and  then  download   to  your  laptop  or  computer.       haps://collegereadiness.collegeboard.org/sites/default/files/ psat_nmsqt_pracQce_test_1.pdf         PSAT  PRACTICE  TEST  #1  ANSWERS   Copy  and  paste  the  address  below  in  your  browser  for  PSAT  Test  #1  Answers  and   then  download  to  your  laptop  or  computer.           haps://collegereadiness.collegeboard.org/sites/default/files/ psat_nmsqt_pracQce_test_1_answers.pdf    

Mrs.  Canady  

General  InformaJon     1.  Two  secJons  :  Reading  and  WriQng  (Essay  is  opQonal)   2.  All  Passages:   a.  Are  from  previously  published  material   b.  Vary  in  difficulty  from  9th  grade  to  college  level   c.  Answers  are  based  on  what  is  stated  or  implied  in  the  passages     3.  Subjects  of  passages:   a.  History/  Social  Sciences   •  Emphasizes  interpretaQon  of  words  in  context   •  Emphasizes  command  of  evidence  (charts,  graphs,  etc.)   b.  Science     •  QuesQons  focus  on  hypotheses,  experimentaQon,  and  data   c.  Literature   •  QuesQons  focus  on  theme,  mood,  and  characterizaQon   •  Defining  words  from  their  use  in  the  sentence/context   •  Command  of  evidence-­‐use  of  passage  to  support  and  analyze  wriaen   and  graphic  informaQon  

Passages:    

!   All  passages  may  be  paired  (2  readings)  and  may  have  a  graph   which  include  charts,  graphs,  or  tables.     !  Each  test  has  a  quesQon  from  each  subject  area.   !  There  will  1-­‐2  graphics  in  the  History,  Social  Sciences,  or   science  passages.   !  Prior  knowledge  of  the  subject  is  not  tested.   !  No  mathemaQcal  computaQon  is  required.  

Reading    

Make  up:  4  single  passages  &  1  paired  /  47  QuesQons   60  Minutes     Three  basic  areas  of  assessment:     1.  Words  in  Context  -­‐  vocabulary   2.  Command  of  Evidence  -­‐    reading  comprehension   a.  Use  of  evidence   b.  Analysis  of  Argument   c.  Analysis  of  QuanQtaQve  InformaQon     3.  Real-­‐world  Context  –  synthesis    

Reading  SecJon  QuesJons:     1. 

InformaJonal  content   a.   Words  in  context   b.  Central  ideas   c.  Evidence   d.  Reasoning     2.  Rhetoric   a.  Word  choice   b.  Text  structure   c.  Point  of  View   d.  Purpose   e.  Argument         3.  Synthesis     4.  Graphs  

Word  in  Context   !  These  quesQons  will  give  you  a  word  or  phrase  and  ask  you   to  select  the  answer  that  could  best  replace  it.   !  Refer  back  to  the  passage  and  try  to  think  of  your  own  word   to  replace  the  one  in  the  quesQon.   !  You  can  also  try  plugging  the  words  into  the  sentence.  

Word  in  Context     1.  We  will  call  upon  our  ciQzens  to  act  bravely  in  this  Qme   of  need.      (A)  shout  at    (B)  visit  briefly    (C)  appeal  to    (D)  cry  for         Note:  If  uncertain  of  answer  –  plug  it  into  the  original                            sentence  to  see  if  it  makes  sense.  

Words  in  Context    

  1.   Hank  was  not  used  to  being  in  the  company  of  such   a  refined  individuals,  and  strove  to  hoose  his  words   and  references  carefully.    (A)  developed    (B)  unadulterated    (C)  cultured    (D)  delicate  

 

Central  Ideas   •  QuesQons  may  ask  you  to  idenQfy  a  reasonable  summary  of  a   specific  part  of  the  passage.  (Use  your  notes!)     •  Central  ideas  should  :   •  (1)  be  accurate  according  to  the  passage   •  (2)  be  reflecQve  of  the  enQre  passage    

•   Could  ask  about  relaQonships  between  parts-­‐  how  the  relate   to  each  other.     •  This  is  the  “big  picture”  of  the  passage!  

Central  Ideas      Wrong  Answers  to  Avoid  

How  to  Avoid  them  

  Makes  judgments  or   asserQons  that  go  beyond   what  is  stated  in  the  passage  

  Choose  answers  based  only  on   what  is  stated  in  the  passage.  

  MenQons  details  that  appear   only  briefly  in  the  passage.  

  Look  for  ideas  discussed   throughout  the  passage  or  at   least  several  paragraphs  

Central  Ideas  Sample  QuesJon       The  events  presented  in  the  passage  are  best  described  as     a)  a  potenQal  soluQon  to  the  mystery  of  who  painted  a                 specific  work  of  art   b)  one  researcher’s  quest  which  is  of  liale  interest  to                         other  historians   c)  the  painstaking  removal  of  certain  artworks  to  reveal  more   valuable  pieces   d)  a  new  discovery  with  potenQally  major  implicaQons  for  art   history  

Evidence   !  These  quesQons  are  to  cite  evidence/  support  from  the   text.     !  The  quesQon  will  provide  4  sentences  from  the  passage   and  ask  which  one  best  supports  (provides  evidence  for)   an  idea.     !  Refer  back  to  the  passage  for  the  evidence.     !  Read  the  sentences  before  and  awer  the  answer.  

 

Evidence  QuesJon  Sample          Which  choice  provides  the  best  evidence  for  the  answer  to                  the  previous  quesQon?      (A)  “A  close-­‐up  …  surface”    (B)  “Awer  months  …  1285”    (C)  “For  centuries  …  Gioao”    (D)  “The  growing  …  November”       Note:  For  evidence,  refer  back  to  the  passage.  

Reasoning   !  You  are  looking  for  an  answer  choice  that  is  the  same  idea   (analogous)  to  an  idea  of  a  passage.     !  You  are  to  find  the  situaQon  that  follows  a  similar  paaern  or   idea  as  the  selected  paaern.     !  The  answer  does  not  have  to  match  the  topic  of  the  passage   only  the  idea  of  the  selected  passage.     !  Try  puyng  the  idea  in  your  own  words.  

Reasoning  QuesJon       !     Which  of  the  following  situaQons  is  most  analogous  to  the   problem  presented  in  the  passage?   !  Which  hypotheQcal  situaQon  involves  the  same  paradox   discussed  by  the  author?   !  The  principle  illustrated  in  lines  16-­‐19  (“By  …  life”)  is  best   conveyed  by  which  addiQonal  informaQon.    

     

 

 

Rhetoric  

1.  Word  Choice   a.  Tone   b.  Rhetoric       2.  Text  Structure   3.  Point  of  View   4.  Purpose     5.  Argument  

Rhetoric   Word  Choice     •    Tone   •  Refers  to  a  feeling  or  aytude                  Rhetorical  Devices   •  RepeQQon,  metaphor,  personificaQon,  etc.  

Rhetoric  –  Word  choice     Asks  how  specific  words,  phrases,  or  paaerns  shape  the   meaning  and  tone  of  the  text.     Example:      The  Author’s  tone  is  best  described  as    (A)  apologeQc    (B)  mournful    (C)  invigorated    (D)  reflecQve  

Rhetoric  –  Word  Choice     Example:     “…  and  the  realizaQon  the  she  herself  was  nothing,  nothing,  nothing   to  the  engaged  young  man  was  a  biaer  afflicQon  to  her.”     The  main  rhetorical  effect  of  the  repeated  word  in  line  13  is  to     a)  underscore  how  frequently  Edna  had  felt  ignored  in  her  teens   b)  suggest  that  Edna  owen  had  to  remind  herself  of  her  proper   place   c)  emphasize  how  liale  Edna  maaered  to  the  young  man   d)  imply  the  Edna  lacked  self-­‐confidence  around  the  young  man   and  Margaret.  

 

Text  Structure     1.  Use  your  summaries.   2.  Mark  up  the  structure.   Concept    

Important    

 

How  to  mark  the   passage  

TransiQon   Words  

Indicate  a  change  in   direcQon  of  the  author’s   reasoning  or  argument  

Circle  the  word  

Examples  or   evidence  

Clarify  concepts  discussed   Note  “e.g.”  or   by  the  author;  can  reveal     how  an  author  has   “e.v”  in  the  margin   supported  his  argument  

Text  Structure  QuesJons     These  quesQons  ask  about  the  structure  of  the  text  as  a  whole,  or  about   the  relaQonship  between  the  whole  text  and  a  specific  part  of  the  text.     Example:   The  author’s  statement  at  lines  11-­‐12  serves  primarily  to      (A)  introduce  evidence  for  his  conclusion    (B)  provide  support  for  an  earlier  argument    (C)  summarize  the  passage    (D)  introduce  the  main  argument  

   

Text  Structure  QuesJon     Example:   The  general  organizaJon  of  the  passage  is  best  described  by   which  of  the  following?     a)  A  problem  is  introduced  but  the  evidence  supporQng  it  is   quesQoned;  the  author  concludes  the  problem  is  solvable.   b)  A  problem  is  introduces  with  evidence  to  support  it;  that   author  introduces  a  compeQng  argument.   c)  Evidence  is  introduced  and  a  problem  is  idenQfied;                   the  author  offers  addiQonal  informaQon.   d)  A  problem  is  introduced  and  a  soluQon  proposed;  the  author   offers  an  alternaQve  soluQon.  

Point  of  View    

The  author’s  point  of  view  or  aytude.     !  Look  for  adjecQves  –  words  used  to  describe  feelings   •  Ex.  Delicious,  love,  hate,  beauQful,  sad,  etc.     !  If  these  descripQons  are  not  aaributed  to  someone  else,  you  may   assume  they  are  from  the  author.   !  Do  not  go  beyond  the  actual  descripQon  to  make  it  beaer  or   worse  than  what  is  implied.  

Point  of  View      Dr.  Chabra  has  found  a  way  to  help  serious  athletes  recover   more  quickly  from  the  sQffness  caused  by  heavy  training.  Like  any   new  medical  intervenQon,  Dr.  Chabra’s  novel  approach  to  treaQng   muscle  soreness  has  been  met  with  some  skepQcism  and  a  lot  of   quesQons.  SQll,  many  of  her  colleagues  praised  the  innovaQve   treatment;  they  rightly  recognized  the  valuable  impact  it  could  have   on  athleQc  performance.     The  author’s  artude  toward  Dr.  Chabra’s  new  treatment  is  best   described  as      (A)  uncertain    (B)  relieved    (C)  disparaging    (D)  approving  

Analyzing  Purpose     !  Asks  about  purpose  of  the  enQre  passage  or  specific  lines  or   paragraphs.     !  Choose  a  “big-­‐picture”  answer  –  why  was  the  passage  wriaen.     !   Is  it  to  persuade?  Argue  against?  Or  Introduce  a  new  concept?     !  Try  to  describe  the  goal  of  the  passage  in  your  own  words   before  looking  for  the  answer.  

Analyzing  Purpose  QuesJon     The  primary  purpose  of  the  passage  is  to      (A)  explain  an  exciQng  discovery    (B)  describe  Cavallini’s  arQsQc  style    (C)  emphasize  the  importance  of  art  history    (D)  discuss  Gioao’s  role  in  the  Renaissance  

Argument   !  The  argument  is  an  idea  that  the  author  believes  is  true  and   trying  to  persuade  you     !  You  must  locate  the  arguments  the  author  believes  to  be  true     !  Ask  yourself  what  the  author  seems  sure  about,  or  what  he  is   trying  to  persuade  you  to  believe.  

Argument  QuesJon     In  lines  6-­‐10  the  author  argues  that       a)  a  Republic  is  the  only  acceptable  form  of    government   b)  only  those  who  can  read  should  be  allowed  to  vote  in  a   Republic   c)  a  true  Republic  must  allow  both  women  and  men  to  vote   d)  a  Republic  is  necessary  to  allow  women  to  vote  

 

Analyzing  Evidence   •  Will  ask  what  kinds  of  evidence  the  author  uses  to  support   his  argument,  or  whether  he  fails  to  use  any     •  There  are  several  kinds  of  evidence  that  can  be  used.     •  First  ask  what  the  argument  is,  then  ask  yourself  what  he   said  to  prove  it.  

Types  of  Evidence/Support   Types  of  Evidence  

DefiniJon  

Data  or     QuanQtaQve   Evidence  

Uses  staQsQcs,  percentages,  or  other   kinds  of  numbers  

Expert  opinion  

Relies  on  the  opinions  of  scholars,   researchers,  or  other  people  with   expert  knowledge  on  the  topic  

Personal  Example  

Uses  a  personal  experience  or   situaQon  encountered  by  the  author  

Comparison  

Compares  an  idea  being  discussed  to   something  else  to  clarify  or  make  a   point  

Appeal  to  emoQon   Creates  feelings  in  the  reader  to   persuade  them  of  an  argument,  

Assessing  Reasoning   !  Ask  you  to  analyze  an  author’s  reasoning  to  see  if  it  makes   sense  or  why  an  author  used  a  certain  type  of  reasoning.     !  Focus  on  the  author’s  overall  goal  for  the  lines  you  are  asked   about,  then  you  can  determine  how  the  reasoning  he  uses   provides  evidence  for  his  point.     !  You  may  have  to  combine  informaQon  from  more  than  1   paragraph  drawing  new  conclusions.  

Analyzing  Argument  QuesJons   !  “The  author  makes  which  of  the  following  arguments?”   !  “The  author  makes  use  of  which  of  the  following  to  support  his   argument?”   !  What  is  the  main  evidence  offered  in  this  passage  for  the   claim…?”   !  “In  lines  #-­‐#,  what  is  the  most  likely  reason  the  author  discusses   Filipino  mobile  money  services?”  

Synthesis  QuesJons   !  This  quesQon  asks  you  to  combine  ideas.     !  You  must  combine  ideas  from  more  than  one  source  (such  as   paired  passages  or  graphs)  for  a  new  idea  to  decide  an   answer.     !  Look  for  repeated  informaQon.    

Synthesis  –  Paired  Passages   !  Pay  aaenQon  to  informaQon  that  appears  in  both  passages.  MARK   IT!     !  Note  an  contrasts  or  opposites  that  you  find  in  the  second  passage.     MARK  IT!     !  You  will  compare  the  informaQon  from  the  passages,  as  well  as   their  structure,  tone,  or  way  of  making  their  argument.       !  Look  first  for  the  element  you  are  asked  about  in  each  passage   first.     !  Then  look  in  the  second  passage  for  the  element.     !  Then  you  can  combine  the  informaQon  into  the  answer.    

Paired  Passage  QuesJons   !  Which  contrast  best  describes  how  the  author  of  each  passage   views  the  link  between  ______  and  _______?”     !  Both  passages  make  use  of  which  of  the  following?     •  Personal  observaQons   •  HypotheQcal  situaQons   •  Expert  opinions   •  QuanQtaQve  informaQon  

 

Paired  Passage  QuesJons  (Con’t)   !  “Unlike  Passage  2,  Passage  1  focuses  on…”   !  “Which  choice  provides  the  best  evidence  for  the  answer  to  the   previous  quesQon?   (A)  -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐  (lines  1-­‐4)   (B)  -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐  (lines  10-­‐13)   (C)  -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐  (lines  20-­‐24)   (D)  -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐  (lines  25-­‐27)  

 

Synthesis  -­‐  Graphs   !  At  least  one  passage  on  every  reading  test  will  be   accompanied  by  a  graph,  table,  chart,  etc.     !  These  are  QuanQtaQve  quesQons  asking  about  amounts  or   quanQQes  (numbers).     !  It  will  ask  you  to  analyze  the  graph  independently,  or  to   understand  how  it  relates  back  to  the  passage.  

Analyzing  Graphs   !  Review  what  is  being  measured  and  the  units  of  measurement.     !  You  can  underline  or  circle  any  items  on  the  graph  that  you  are   asked  about.     !  Assess  the  answers  based  on  the  informaQon  of  the  graph  –  Be   careful  not  to  make  any  assumpQons  

Graphs  to  Passages   !  Look  for  lines  in  the  graph  that  discuss  the  same  subjects  as   being  measured  in  the  graph.     !  IdenQfy  the  same  informaQon  in  the  passage.     !  Then,  compare  the  informaQon.     !  You  must  combine  these  two  sources  for  a  “big  picture”    

Synthesis  Graph  QuesJons   !  “It  can  reasonably  be  inferred  from  the  passage  and  graphic   that…”   !  “Which  claim  about  energy  consumpQon  is  supported  by  the   graph?”  

WriJng  SecJon   !  Make  up-­‐  4  passages  /  44  quesQons  /  35  minutes     !  You  will  be  required  to  write  and  edit  texts.     !  This  will  test  your  knowledge  on  grammar  rules  and   elements  of  effecQve  wriQng.     !  This  secQon  contributes  to  4  sub  scores:      Command  of   Evidence;  Words  in  Context;  Expression  of  Ideas;  Standard   English  ConvenJons  

 

WriJng  SecJon   1.  Developing  Ideas   a.  InformaQve   b.  NarraQve   c.  ArgumentaQve   2.  Graphics   3.  Order  of  Use   4.  Use  of  Language  

 

Developing  Ideas   1. 

Passages  Styles   1.  InformaQve   2.  NarraQve   3.  Argument     2.  Main  Point     3.  Support  and  Evidence  

Developing  Ideas   !  Passage  Styles:  

  Style   InformaQve  

Goal  

Examples  

Give  accurate   informaQon  

Research,   summaries,   instrucQons  

ArgumentaQve  

Persuade  the  reader  

Opinions,  debates,   editorials  

NarraQve  

Tell  a  story  

Biographies,  ficQon,   anecdotes  

 

Developing  Ideas     !  Main  Point   "  The  central  idea   "  QuesQons  may  ask  you  to  edit  the  sentence  with  the  main   point  so  that  it  beaer  represents  the  central  idea   "  Main  points  should:   •  Express  the  core  idea  of  the  author   •  Summarize  the  conclusion  drawn  from  informaQon  in   the  paragraph   •  Maintain  the  tone  of  the  author  and  the  style  of  the   language  

Developing  Ideas   !  Support  and  Focus   •  You  may  be  asked  to  support  claims  with  addiQonal   informaQon     •  The  style  of  wriQng  owen  determines  what  type  of   evidence  the  author  will  use.   #  Arguments  will  need  some  addiQonal  facts   #  NarraQve  styles  will  use  some  addiQonal  stories     •  SomeQmes  paragraphs  will  contain  an  error  in  the   development  of  the  evidence   #  A  sentence  that  provides  irrelevant  informaQon  

Types  of  support   Type  

ExplanaJon  

Example  

Facts    

True,  declaraQve   statements  

The  First  President  of  the   United  States  was  George   Washington.  

StaJsJcs  

Facts  presented  in   numerical  form  

About  71%  of  the  Earth’s   surface  is  covered  with  water.  

Examples  

IllustraQons  of  the   point  the  author    

Jack  owen  gets  into  trouble.   He  was  grounded  just  last   week.  

Opinions  

Views  of  the  author  or   New  York  city  is  too  crowded   an  expert,  not   to  be  enjoyable.   necessarily  using  the   facts  

Anecdotes   Personal  stories  or   memories  

Even  though  it  was  small,  our   family’s  lake  house  was  my   favorite  place.  

Developing  Ideas  -­‐  QuesJons   !  “Which  choice  most  effecQvely  establishes  the  main  point  of   the  passage?”     !  Which  choice,  inserted  here,  most  effecQvely  adds  support  for   the  statement  in  sentence  5?”     !  To  improve  the  focus  of  this  paragraph,  which  sentence  should   be  deleted?”  

Graphics   !  Some  passages  will  include  graphs  for  evidence.     !  These  may  by  in  the  form  of  graphs,  charts,  tables,  or  others.     !  Checklist  for  reading  a  graph:   $  What  are  the  Qtles?   $  On  a  graph,  what  are  the  axes?   $  What  are  the  units?   $  Is  there  a  legend?  

Sample  graph  

Organizing  Ideas   !  Helps  the  author  express  his  ideas.   !  Two  elements  to  look  for:   1.  Logical  order   2.  Signal  Words  

Organizing  Ideas   Logical  Order   !  You  will  be  asked  to  revise,  add,  or  remove  sentences  to  improve   the  logical  order  of  a  paragraph.       !  You  must  first  idenQfy  what  the  sentence  is  doing  in  the   paragraph     !  The  first  sentence  states  the  main  point  followed  by  supporQng   evidence      

Logical  Order  QuesJon       “For  the  sake  of  the  cohesion  of  this  paragraph,  sentence  4   should  be  placed      (A)  where  it  is  now    (B)  Before  sentence  1    (C)  awer  sentence  2    (D)  awer  sentence  5  

Organizing  Ideas   Signal  Words   •  Connect  informaQon  in  a  paragraph     •  They  signal  conQnuaQons,  examples,  changes,  and   conclusions     •  Tell  you  where  sentences  should  go     •  You  may  be  asked  to  revise  misused  signal  words     •  You  may  also  be  asked  to  add  signal  words  or  phrases  to   exisQng  sentences  to  create  or  improve  the  flow  of  the   paragraph  

Signal  Words   Type  of  Signal   Word  

Examples  

ConJnuaJons  

Moreover,  also,  addiQonally,  similarly,  furthermore,   next  

Examples  

For  example,  much  like,  specifically,  for  instance  

Change  

While,  in  spite  of,  yet,  however,  although  

Conclusion  

As  a  result,  finally,  therefore,  consequently,  hence  

Use  of  Language   !  Refers  to  the  use  of  language       !  You  will  be  asked  to  revise  the  language  of  the  author  to  more   effecQvely  convey  his  ideas   1.  Precision   2.  Style   3.  Tone   4.  Style  

 

Use  of  Language   Precise   !  Choose  the  word  or  phrase  that  best  completes  the   sentence.     !  Your  goal  is  to  choose  the  right  word  for  what  the  author   has  to  say.     !  Two  ways:   1.  You  will  choose  the  best  word  of  similar  words   2.  Using  commonly  confused  or  misused  words  

Use  of  Language   Concise   !  When  phrases  give  a  lot  of  informaQon  in  the  fewest   words  possible     !  Some  sentences  may  use  “empty  words”   •  Ex.  He  is  a  man  who  is  always  busy.  He  owen  switches   in  a  hasty  manner  from  one  task  to  the  next.   •  Beaer-­‐  He  is  always  busy.  He  owen  switches  hasQly   from  one  task  to  another  to  the  next.  

Use  of  Language   Tone   !  The  author’s  aytude     !  You  will  not  be  idenQfying  the  author’s  tone,  but  revising  a   passage  to  match  the  author’s  tone.  

Tone  –  Ex.   Chimpanzees  are  obviously  as  intelligence  as  humans.   a)  NO  CHANGE   b)  Those  scienQsts  who  originally  disagreed               were  not  as  observant  as  Goodall.   c)  She  determined  that  chimpanzees  possess                   similar  tool-­‐making  aniliQes  to  humans.   d)  I  will  always  admire  Jane  Goodall  for  her    work  in   expanding  our  knowledge  of  chimpanzees  abiliQes.  

Social  Sciences     !  Will  be  from  a  newspaper,  magazine,  or  non-­‐ficQon   book  (contemporary)   !  Topics  will  be  economics,  psychology,  linguisQcs,  and   history   !  Approach  like  a  science  passage.  

History  Passage     !  There  will  be  one  historical  document  from  the  Founding   documents  of  the  U.S.   •  DeclaraQon  of  Independence,     The  U.S.  ConsQtuQon,  of  the  Bill  of  rights     !    Global  conversaJon     •  speech  of  Winston  Churchill,  passage  from  a  speech  of   Nelson  Mandela,  a  leaer  from  Gandhi     !     These  passages  may  be  explanatory  or  argumentaJve,                        but  can  also  be  persuasive  

   

Answering  a  History    passage     $  Pay  aaenQon  to  the  important  people,  places,  and  things   listed   $  Pay  aaenQon  to  claims  and  facts   $  Pay  parQcular  aaenQon  to  the  author’s  use  of  rhetoric  –   figuraQve  language,  similes,  and  metaphors   $  NoQce  the  emphasis  of  repeQQon  of  words  or  words  with   the  same  meanings   $  Pay  aaenQon  to  idenQfy  the  thesis  and  the  supporQng   details  

 

Science  Passages     !  There  are  2  science  passages  in  the  reading  secQon     !  The  passages  are  from  magazines,  newspapers,  or  non-­‐ficQon   books  on  popular  science     !  These  sciences  include:  physics,  biology,  astronomy,  chemistry,  or   similar  fields     !  You  are  not  being  tested  on  scienQfic  knowledge,  but  any   knowledge  of  the  language  of  science  can  be  helpful     !  It  will  include  1-­‐2  graphics     !  It  might  include  a  paired  passage     !  It  will  include  the  same  features  of  a  literary  passage  such  as:   figuraQve  language,  narraQve  or  descripQve  elements  

Answering  a  Science  Passage       $  As  always,  pay  aaenQon  to  important  people,  places,  and   things     $  Your  goal  is  to  idenQfy  the  main  topic  or  argument     $  Understand  how  the  addiQonal  informaQon  and  evidence   explains  the  subject  or  supports  the  argument   $  Pay  special  aaenQon  to  data  and  experimental  evidence   and  to  the  elements  of  the  argument  presented  in  the   passage  

 Elements  of  an  Argument     Thesis  

  The  main  idea  being  defended  

  Claims  

  Statements  by  the  author   supposedly  true  

SupporJng   Evidence  

  InformaQon  used  to  back  up  the   claims  

Counterclaims   Claims  that  disagree  or  contradict   And  refutaJons   what  the  author  is  saying     Conclusion  

  A  concluding  statement  that   restates  the  thesis  

Science  Passages  –  Experiments     !  Science  passages  will  discuss  experiments     !  They  may  be  the  supporQng  evidence  or  the  main  idea     !  Helps  to  be  familiar  with  the  basic  facts  of  how  experiments  are   conducted  and  what  they  mean   Basic  Idea:   %    Experiments  measure  1  thing-­‐  cause  and  effect   %  It  does  not  say  if  they  are  good  or  bad   %  Consider  the  variables-­‐  what  is  altered,  measured,  controlled   %  Note  which  they  change  and  which  they  measure  

Science  Passages  –  Experiments     !  There  are  some  important  things  to  remember  about   evidence  based  on  an  experiment:     Drawing  conclusions:   &    They  are  value  neutral  –  not  good  or  bad   &  They  only  demonstrate  very  specific  relaQonships   &  DisQnguish  between  what  the  experiment  suggests   and  what  it  demonstrates  

Literature  Passages  

!  This  passage  will  usually  be  an  excerpt  from  a  novel  or  a  short   story     !  Sources  can  be  older  material  or  newer     !  Passages  will  usually  tell  a  story  or  describe  a  scene,  object,  or   character  

Answering  a  Literary  Passage   $  Look  for  any  underlying  message   $  Pay  aaenQon  to  the  author’s  use  of  language  and  literary   techniques  to  convey  the  message   $  You  are  not  being  tested  on  your  knowledge  of  literature   –  but  should  be  comfortable  reading  different  types  of   literature   $  Summarize  –  make  short  notes  about  the  passage  

Important  Details  in  literary  language:       1.  FiguraJve  Language  –  alliteraQon,  hyperbole,  idioms,   personificaQon,  metaphors,  and  similes   %  These  elements  will  help  you  understand  the  message   %  It  provides  hints  about  the  author’s  purpose   2.  CharacterizaJon   %  DescripQon   %  Dialogue   %  AcQon   %  Internal  Speech   %  Responses   3.  Structure   %  DescripQve   %  NarraQve  

Graphics     !  At  least  one  passage  on  every  reading  test  will  have  a  graph,   table,  or  chart   !  These  quesQons  are  asking  you  to  synthesize  informaQon  (make   connecQons  between  2  sources)  

Analyzing  Graphics     $  Pay  careful  aaenQon  to  what  is  being  measured  and  the  units   of  measurement   $  For  a  general  quesQon,  “Which  claim  is  supported  by  the   graph,”  read  each  answer  choice  against  the  answers   $  Don’t  make  decisions  on  informaQon  not  stated  

RelaJng  Graphics  to  Passages     $  Look  for  lines  in  the  passage  that  discuss  the  same  subjects   being  directly  presented  in  the  graph   $  Compare  the  informaQon  in  the  passage  against  the   informaQon  of  the  graph   $  If  the  informaQon  is  different,  then  you  have  to  combine  the   two  in  order  to  come  up  with  the  best  conclusion   Note:  You  can  write  on  the  graphs!  

Paired  Passages     !  One  passage  of  the  test  will  be  a  paired  passage   !  Paired  passages  are  going  to  ask  you  to  synthesize   informaQon  –  make  connecQons  between  the  2  passages   !  The  best  way  to  approach  these  passages  is  to  read  one   at  a  Qme,  then  answer  the  quesQons  for  that  passage   !  The  read  the  second  one  and  do  likewise  

 

Analyzing  Paired  Passages     !  Awer  doing  each  passage,  consider  the  quesQons  that  apply  to   both     !  RepeaQng  ideas   $  Look  for  informaQon  that  appears  in  both  passages  –  mark   them   $  Look  for  contrasQng  ideas  –  mark  them     !  Answering  the  QuesQons   $  These  quesQons  require  answers  from  both  passages   $  This  can  mean  structure,  tone,  or  argument     $  Consider  each  passage  individually,  looking  for  the  answer   to  the  quesQon   $  Then  combine  or  compare  your  answers  

The  End  ☺  

MATH  SECTION   PSAT  Training  Course     Mrs.  Deim   Kaplan  New  SAT  

115  

HEART  OF  ALGEBRA   LINEAR  EQUATIONS   116  

Kaplan  New  SAT   117  

118  

Kaplan  New  SAT   119  

Kaplan  New  SAT   120  

Kaplan  New  SAT   121  

Kaplan  New  SAT   122  

Kaplan  New  SAT   123  

Kaplan  New  SAT   124  

Kaplan  New  SAT   125  

Kaplan  New  SAT   126  

Kaplan  New  SAT   127  

Kaplan  New  SAT   128  

Kaplan  New  SAT   129  

Kaplan  New  SAT   130  

Kaplan  New  SAT   131  

Kaplan  New  SAT   132  

HEART  OF  ALGEBRA   SYSTEMS  OF  EQUATIONS   133  

Kaplan  New  SAT   134  

Kaplan  New  SAT   135  

Kaplan  New  SAT   136  

Kaplan  New  SAT   137  

Kaplan  New  SAT   138  

Kaplan  New  SAT   139  

Kaplan  New  SAT   140  

Kaplan  New  SAT   141  

Kaplan  New  SAT   142  

Kaplan  New  SAT   143  

Kaplan  New  SAT   144  

Kaplan  New  SAT   145  

Kaplan  New  SAT   146  

Kaplan  New  SAT   147  

Kaplan  New  SAT   148  

Kaplan  New  SAT   149  

PROBLEM  SOLVING    &  DATA  ANALYSIS   PROBLEM  SOLVING   150  

Kaplan  New  SAT   151  

Kaplan  New  SAT   152  

Kaplan  New  SAT   153  

Kaplan  New  SAT   154  

Kaplan  New  SAT   155  

Kaplan  New  SAT   156  

Kaplan  New  SAT   157  

Kaplan  New  SAT   158  

Kaplan  New  SAT   159  

Kaplan  New  SAT   160  

Kaplan  New  SAT   161  

Kaplan  New  SAT   162  

Kaplan  New  SAT   163  

Kaplan  New  SAT   164  

Kaplan  New  SAT   165  

Kaplan  New  SAT   166  

PASSPORT  TO     ADVANCED  MATH   EXPONENTS,  RADICALS,   POLYNOMIALS,  AND  RATIONAL   EXPRESSIONS  

167  

Kaplan  New  SAT   168  

Kaplan  New  SAT   169  

Kaplan  New  SAT   170  

Kaplan  New  SAT   171  

Kaplan  New  SAT   172  

Kaplan  New  SAT   173  

Kaplan  New  SAT   174  

Kaplan  New  SAT   175  

Kaplan  New  SAT   176  

Kaplan  New  SAT   177  

Kaplan  New  SAT  

178  

Kaplan  New  SAT   179  

Kaplan  New  SAT   180  

Kaplan  New  SAT   181  

Kaplan  New  SAT   182  

Kaplan  New  SAT   183  

PASSPORT  TO     ADVANCED  MATH   FUNCTIONS  &     FUNCTION  NOTATION   184  

Kaplan  New  SAT   185  

Kaplan  New  SAT   186  

Kaplan  New  SAT   187  

Kaplan  New  SAT   188  

Kaplan  New  SAT   189  

Kaplan  New  SAT   190  

Kaplan  New  SAT   191  

Kaplan  New  SAT   192  

Kaplan  New  SAT   193  

Kaplan  New  SAT   194  

Kaplan  New  SAT   195  

Kaplan  New  SAT   196  

Kaplan  New  SAT   197  

Kaplan  New  SAT   198  

Kaplan  New  SAT   199  

Kaplan  New  SAT   200  

PASSPORT  TO     ADVANCED  MATH   QUADRATIC  EQUATIONS   201  

Kaplan  New  SAT   202  

Kaplan  New  SAT   203  

Kaplan  New  SAT   204  

Kaplan  New  SAT   205  

Kaplan  New  SAT   206  

Kaplan  New  SAT   207  

Kaplan  New  SAT   208  

Kaplan  New  SAT   209  

Kaplan  New  SAT   210  

Kaplan  New  SAT   211  

Kaplan  New  SAT   212  

Kaplan  New  SAT   213  

Kaplan  New  SAT   214  

Kaplan  New  SAT   215  

Kaplan  New  SAT   216  

Kaplan  New  SAT   217  

ADDITIONAL  TOPICS  

218  

Kaplan  New  SAT   219  

Kaplan  New  SAT   220  

Kaplan  New  SAT   221  

Kaplan  New  SAT   222  

Kaplan  New  SAT   223  

Kaplan  New  SAT   224  

Kaplan  New  SAT   225  

Kaplan  New  SAT   226  

227  

View more...

Comments

Copyright � 2017 SILO Inc.
SUPPORT SILO