ENABLE Progress Report #6. October 2011 March ENABLE Management Team

November 15, 2016 | Author: Rudolf Thomas | Category: N/A
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1 October 2011 March 2012 ENABLE Management Team A DFID funded programme delivered by Adam Smith International and the S...

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ENABLE Progress Report #6 October 2011 – March 2012 ENABLE Management Team

A DFID funded programme delivered by Adam Smith International and the Springfield Centre

ACRONYMS ACEN

Association of Consulting Engineers of Nigeria

AIAE

African Institute for Applied Economics

ASCON

Administrative Staff College of Nigeria

BE

Business Environment

BER

Business Environment Reform

BMO

Business Membership Organisation

CBN

Central Bank of Nigeria

COREN

Council for the Regulation of Engineers in Nigeria

CPPA

Center for Public Policy Alternatives

CRD

Center for Research and Documentation

CSO

Civil Society Organisations

DMA

Dawanau Market Association

DFID

Department For International Development

ELAN

Equipment Leasing Association of Nigeria

ENABLE

Enhancing Nigerian Advocacy for a Better Business Environment

E-PPAN

Electronic Payment Providers Association of Nigeria

ESG

Economic Summit Groups

FCTA

Federal Capital Territory Authority

FEPSAN

Fertilizer Producers and Suppliers Association of Nigeria

FIRS

Federal Inland Revenue Service

FLG

Finished Leather Goods

FMoH

Federal Ministry of Health

FMTI

Federal Ministry of Trade and Investments

FRCN

Federal Radio Corporation of Nigeria

GEMS

Growth and Employment in States

GWG

Gender Working Group

IoD

Institute of Directors

KADCCIMA

Kaduna Chambers of Commerce, Industry, Mining and Agriculture

KaSTU

Kano State Traders Union

KBS

Kaduna Business School

LAPAN

Leather and Applied Products Association of Nigeria

LCCI

Lagos Chamber of Commerce and Industries

LsMB&P

Lagos State Ministry of Budget and Planning

LsMOC

Lagos State Ministry of Commerce

LsMOI

Lagos State Ministry Of Information

LTV

Lagos TV

LUAAAG

Land Use Act Amendment Advocacy Group

M&E

Monitoring and Evaluation

M4P

Making Markets Work for the Poor

MACBAN

Miyetti Allah Cattle Breeders Association of Nigeria

MAN

Manufacturers Association of Nigeria

MBAN

Mortgage Bankers Association of Nigeria

MDA

Ministries, Departments and Agencies

MFB

Micro Finance Banks

MoU

Memorandum of Understanding

MCSN

Musical Copyright Society Nigeria

NACCIMA

National Association of Chambers of Commerce, Industries, Mining and Agriculture

NANTS

National Association of Nigerian Traders

NBCC

Nigeria British Chamber of Commerce

NIM

Nigerian Institute of Management

NIPC

National Investment Promotion Council

NISER

Nigerian Institute for Social and Economic Research

NISRAL

Nigerian Incentive Based Risk Sharing System for Agricultural Lending

NPC

National Planning Commission

NYSC

National Youth Service Corps

OPS

Organized Private Sector

PARE

Pastoral Resolve

PMI

Primary Mortgage Institute

PPD

Public Private Dialogue

PSSDC

Public Service Staff Development Centre

PTI

Public Training Institutes

RI

Research and Information

SAVI

State Accountability and Voice Initiatives

SENEC

South East Nigeria Economic Commission

SME

Small and Medium Enterprises

SURE

Subsidy Reinvestment and Empowerment Programme

VfM

Value for Money

W&D

Withdrawals and Deposits

DEFINITIONS 

Attribution – the degree to which an observed change was caused by a specific programme intervention (as opposed to exogenous factors).



Copying – organisations already active in the market adopt or imitate a programmeinduced innovation. Copying can also occur within a given organisation (for example, when one department copies another department within the same organisation).



Crowding-in – organisations not already active in the market adopt or imitate a programme-induced innovation.



Impact – the change engendered, directly or indirectly, by a programme activity or intervention. Impact can be measured at multiple levels. Impact normally refers to positive changes, but can include negative (unintended) consequences. Note that an observed change cannot be classified as impact until attribution has been established.



Market system – the set of support functions and rules that underpin the core demandsupply transaction.



Replication – the imitation of a programme-induced innovation by organisations or actors not directly targeted by the programme. Replication can take the form of copying or crowding-in.



Service Providers - Organisations that provide support functions and/or rules in the market. Not necessarily commercial entities, can include not-for-profits, public institutions, Quangos, associations, etc.



Sustainability – the degree to which positive impact is maintained (or enhanced) over time, especially once the intervention has ended.



Systemic change – a fundamental realignment of the relationships, rules, roles or dynamics in a given market or system.

IMPACT See Section F for full ENABLE logframe 

Goal-level impact – Policy and regulatory environment for doing business improved



Purpose-level impact – Improvements in the level and quality of private sector advocacy and the effectiveness of public-private dialogue



Output-level impact: -

Output 1: Business Membership Organizations (BMOs) demonstrate competence to engage in effective advocacy

-

Output 2: Media proactively investigates and airs public policy and regulatory issues affecting the private sector

-

Output 3: Ministries, Departments & Agencies (MDAs) demonstrate willingness and capacity to engage with the private sector

-

Output 4: Effective and affordable support services (especially research provision) are available to BMOs and MDAs on a sustainable basis

CONTENTS A ENABLE IN BRIEF ........................................................................................... 1 B PROGRAMME HIGHLIGHTS................................................................................ 2 1 2 3 4 5 6

Programme Developments ........................................................................................... 2 Goal level Impact .......................................................................................................... 3 Purpose level Impact .................................................................................................... 4 Impact to Date .............................................................................................................. 5 Collaboration ................................................................................................................ 5 Challenges ..................................................................................................................... 6

C PURPOSE AND GOAL LEVEL IMPACT ................................................................... 7 1 2

Goal and purpose level impact: To September 2011 ................................................... 7 Goal and purpose level impact: October 2011 – March 2012...................................... 8

D OUTPUT-LEVEL IMPACT .................................................................................. 12 1 2 3 4 5

Output 1: BMOs .......................................................................................................... 12 Output 2: Government ............................................................................................... 14 Output 3: Media ......................................................................................................... 17 Output 4: Information ................................................................................................ 19 Programme Learning and Development..................................................................... 20

E FINANCIAL SUMMARY ................................................................................... 21 F

LOGFRAME

.............................................................................................. 22

Cover image: A reporter from Wazobia FM, an ENABLE media partner, interviews a trader at Mile 12 Market to learn more about the issues affecting her ability to operate and grow her business.

ENABLE Progress Report #6

A

ENABLE IN BRIEF Enhancing Nigerian Advocacy for a Better Business Environment (ENABLE) is a 4.5 year DFIDfunded programme that seeks to improve the quality and quantity of business advocacy and Public-Private Dialogue (PPD) in Nigeria, resulting in an improved legal, policy and regulatory environment for poor and excluded male and female entrepreneurs and business owners. ENABLE seeks to: 

Strengthen private sector demand for reform by supporting Business Membership Organisations (BMOs) to engage in effective advocacy on behalf of the private sector;



Increase the quality and quantity of reform by building the ability and willingness of Government Ministries, Departments and Agencies (MDAs) to dialogue with the private sector;



Strengthen the role of the Nigerian media as a driver and supporter of business environment reform, a channel for information, and a platform for debate and discussion;



Improve access to, and supply of, legal, policy and regulatory information and other services that serve to stimulate and inform dialogue; and,



Promote changes to formal and informal rules and norms that restrict effective dialogue.

ENABLE is a catalyst for systemic change. Although the programme’s goal is to improve the business environment in Nigeria, ENABLE does not seek to get a certain number of new businessfriendly bills passed per se but instead helps to create a system in which the public and private sector engage in effective dialogue around business environment issues. If ENABLE is successful, this system will, of itself, generate business friendly regulation. Following the M4P approach, ENABLE is a facilitator – it builds the capacity of local actors but does not directly perform functions that should be performed by local actors themselves. The goal is to bring about sustainable change so that ENABLE’s partners are able to continue to engage in effective dialogue and advocacy long after the programme has finished.

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B

PROGRAMME HIGHLIGHTS This Progress Report provides a summary of programme activities and results over the period October 2011 to March 2012. ENABLE has delivered significant purpose and goal level impact despite facing challenges from fuel-subsidy protests, a five-day national strike and escalating violence in the North. During the six-month period there were nine public-private dialogues (purpose-level impact), leading to two cases of improvements in the business environment (goal-level impact). ENABLE also recorded some exciting output-level impact, such as the launch of a new weekly radio programme with Wazobia FM that investigates business environment issues.

1

PROGRAMME DEVELOPMENTS Figure 1: ENABLE’s lifecycle

ENABLE is currently midway through Phase 3 (which encompasses years three and four). In the past year, special attention was given to partners who were associated with pro-poor and gender sensitive issues, with reach in the Northern parts of Nigeria, such as Kaduna Chambers of Commerce, Industry, Mining and Agriculture (KADCCIMA), Gender Working Group (GWG), Pastoral Resolve (PARE) and Wazobia FM Lagos. To monitor this complex phase, ENABLE has upgraded its Impact Assessment System, to better capture impact and learning from interventions. ENABLE has initiated a process to upgrade communications to better report and explain impact achieved, particularly with DFID-Nigeria (for example, the two-page ENABLE Updates that highlight exciting new developments). This upgrading process will continue over the coming

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months. Programme innovations in impact measurement and communications are further described in the latter section of this document. The ENABLE strategy has continued to evolve over the last six months. A key development has been the use of specific Business Environment (BE) issues as a coordination point. This development provides an opportunity to effectively leverage available resources, improves the chances of achieving greater impact on the BE and further supports sustainability. The series of actions taken by the various ENABLE partners, contributing to the changes in the upcoming ‘Cashless Nigeria’ policy, is a good example of ENABLE supporting and facilitating such organisation around a single issue. Impact presented in the later sections of this report will provide further examples of this process in action. In the last six months ENABLE has also collaborated with other DFID programmes to improve the value for money (VfM) and impact of interventions by gaining greater impact in focal states. Objectives of such collaborations were to achieve scale; replication or crowding-in will feature more in the 4th year of the programme. ENABLE has engaged with GEMS 1, GEMS 2, GEMS 3 and SAVI to work on various advocacy and technical assistance issues relevant to SMEs, women based CSOs and other vulnerable groups in Lagos, Kano, Kaduna and Cross River states. These examples are built upon in Section 5 of this report.

2

GOAL LEVEL IMPACT In the period October 2011 to March 2012, ENABLE documented two cases of goal level impact. Both cases involved ENABLE supporting multiple stakeholder groups working around a specific BE issue, something that will become standard practice in Year 4. Table 1: Goal Level Impact (October 2011 to March 2012) Changes to regulations on Cashless Nigeria policy

The limits to daily withdrawals and deposits (W&D) were increased from 150,000 Naira to 500,000 Naira and the associated charges for W&D were reduced to 2% (withdrawals) and 3% (deposits) from earlier levels of 10%. The change in the regulations will lead to savings by SMEs in the form of reduced charges of W&D and more frequent instances of charge waivers due to increased W&D limits. Alongside changing the regulations for individuals on W&D, another ENABLE partner, the Mortgage Bankers Association of Nigeria (MBAN), successfully advocated for the exemption of PMIs from the charges mentioned in the Cashless Policy.

Changes to the draft Trade and Investment policy of FMTI

Six of the 33 recommendations made by private sector stakeholders to the draft Trade and Investment Policy were accepted by the Federal Ministry of Trade and Investment (FMTI). The recommendations accepted covered issues governing trade of agricultural products, streamlining cross border trade and the regulation of informal trade. The approval and eventual implementation of the accepted changes would benefit cross border traders by reducing the number of steps to the cross border trading process, reducing multiple charges by agencies and reducing the time taken to complete cross border trade formalities

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ENABLE Progress Report #6

3

PURPOSE LEVEL IMPACT In the past six months, ENABLE has seen an increase in the frequency of Public-Private Dialogue (PPD) events. This is apparent in 9 purpose level results attributable to the various partners of ENABLE. The results have been in the form of dialogues between private and public sector stakeholders on various issues spanning job creation, Cashless Nigeria, the fuel subsidy and food safety issues. Some of the more significant consultation and dialogue events involved the Cashless Nigeria policy, the Draft Trade and Investment Policy and the Draft Food Safety Policy. Two out of these three dialogue processes resulted in impact at the goal level. The partnerships and their corresponding purpose level impact is shown in the table below: Table 1: Purpose Level Impact (October 2011 to March 2013) ENABLE Partners

Purpose level impact

CRD

Dialogue on Policy Reversals in Kano

E-PPAN

Grass-root sensitisation on the Cashless Nigeria policy and a dialogue session on ‘Cashless Nigeria’

FMoH, NACCIMA

Consultation and dialogue sessions on Draft Food Safety Policy

FMTI

Consultation and dialogue sessions on Draft Trade Policy

IoD

Roundtable session on ‘Cashless Nigeria’

LAPAN

Dialogue with CBN around the inclusion of the Leather value chain into NISRAL, CBN’s intervention fund promoting business growth (with GEMS3)

LCCI

Dialogue on ‘Cashless Nigeria’ policy of CBN

NACCIMA, CPPA

Dialogue on Fuel Subsidy Removal

NISER

Launch of seminar series promoting exchange between private and public sector organisations

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4

IMPACT TO DATE The chart below presents cumulative impact across two of ENABLE’s key indicators: additional dialogues (Purpose-level) and BE reforms (Goal-level). The end of programme target for BE reforms has been exceeded, and ENABLE is on course to exceed the target for additional dialogues. Figure 2: Impact to Date: Additional Dialogues and BE Reforms

Number of dialogues/BE reforms

35 30 25 20 15 10 5 0 Oct 08 Mar 09

Apr 09 Sep 09

Oct 09 Mar 10

Apr 10 Sep 10

Oct 10 Mar 11

Apr 11 Sep 11

Oct 11 Mar 12

Apr 12 Sep 12

Oct 12 Mar 13

Six month reporting periods

5

No. of dialogues (cumulative)

No. of BE reforms (cumulative)

End programme target (dialogues)

End programme target (BE reforms)

COLLABORATION ENABLE has seen a marked increase in the number of collaborations with other DFID programmes. These collaborations were undertaken to increase the effectiveness of our support, improve VfM by leveraging the expertise of other programmes and increase opportunities for scale and replication. ENABLE will build on these collaborations and exploit other opportunities over the coming months. Instances of collaborations with other programmes are provided below: Table 2: Areas of Collaboration between ENABLE and other programmes Programme

Areas of collaboration

GEMS 1

ENABLE, in collaboration with GEMS 1, engaged the Leather and Applied Products Association of Nigeria (LAPAN) and Finished Leather Goods (FLG) in strengthening their advocacy capacity, resulting in a dialogue with CBN around the inclusion of the Leather value chain into the Nigerian Incentive Based Risk Sharing System for Agricultural Lending (NISRAL), CBN’s intervention fund promoting business growth. ENABLE also supported the BMOs in articulating their proposal to CBN on the conditions for accessing the fund (loan guideline).

GEMS 2

ENABLE partnered with GEMS 2 in engaging the Association of Consulting Engineers of Nigeria (ACEN) to support their advocacy initiatives on the issue of Page | 5

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Programme

Areas of collaboration inclusion of ACEN to the regulatory body for engineers. This is aimed at increasing ACEN influence in policy formulations relevant to the field of engineering. Additional ENABLE support is aimed at assisting in targeted fundraising for development of an industry paper highlighting the local engineering professionals

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GEMS 3

ENABLE engaged with GEMS 3 on the topics of local levies and multiple taxations in Kaduna, Kano and Cross River states alongside engaging Kano and Kaduna Boards of Internal Revenue on improving voluntary compliance to taxes through taxpayer consultation and dialogue

SAVI

ENABLE supported GWG on the creation of advocacy platform focusing on issues relevant to Kaduna based women and other vulnerable group CSOs through providing trainings on the advocacy process

CHALLENGES The last six months was a challenging period for ENABLE; several events beyond the programme’s control had a negative impact on the operating environment. The national strikes prompted by the removal of the fuel subsidies in January 2012 caused significant disruptions to all our partnerships. As well as time lost and postponed activities, the strikes also diverted attention from other business environment issues, especially within government. On balance, however, the longer terms effects of the strike may in fact be positive, as it vividly demonstrated to government the importance of more open and inclusive policy-making. The prevailing sense of insecurity in Nigeria, especially in the North, has caused significant interruptions in ENABLE’s work in the North. Restrictions on travel and frequent incidences of violence and curfews have disrupted our partnerships in Kano and Kaduna. At the same time, the security issue has had a debilitating effect on the implementation of BER in these states. Nonetheless these challenges serve a timely reminder to ENABLE and its partners of the importance of the programme’s objectives in generating economic and social opportunities for all Nigerians, but particularly the poorest and most vulnerable.

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ENABLE Progress Report #6

C

PURPOSE AND GOAL LEVEL IMPACT In the last six months, ENABLE has observed many examples of partners demonstrating greater commitment , and devoting more of their own resources, to advocacy and consultation. As a result, and as our partnerships mature, more partners are contributing to purpose level impact, with several dialogues leading all the way to reforms in the business environment (goal-level impact). In the last six months, ENABLE has also improved the way it identifies and acts on synergies across the four components. This has significantly improved the quality of dialogues, which should feed through to a higher conversion rate of dialogues to goal-level impact. The new approach is already starting to pay dividends, as witnessed by the changes to the CBN Cashless Nigeria Policy and the Draft Trade and Investment Policy, as well as the quality of the FMoH dialogue on Food Standards – in all three cases ENABLE supported both the public sector and private sector.

1

GOAL AND PURPOSE LEVEL IMPACT: TO SEPTEMBER 2011 ENABLE is at the end of its 3rd Year of implementation. By the end of Year 3, ENABLE saw evidence of an uptrend in the number of purpose and goal level impacts. This acceleration of impact is displayed in Figure 2. ENABLE had already achieved its target of attributable changes to the business environment by March 2011. As of September 2011, ENABLE recorded the following goal and purpose level impact: Table 4: Purpose and Goal level impact to September 2011 Level and indicators for change

Impact

Goal level impact (Number of changes in policy and regulatory environment for doing business)

1. Awarding of licenses to collect royalties to Musical Copyright Society Nigeria (MCSN) 2. Improvement of the conditions of the abattoir in South Kaduna through Federal Radio Corporation of Nigeria (FRCN) 3. Allocation of finance for access by traders at Dawanau Market Association (DMA) Kano through Freedom FM Kano 4. Inclusion of Organized Private Sector (OPS) in the formation of FG Cabinet as well as setting up of a quota for two members in the FG cabinet 5. Passage of the Local Government Levies Bill (Lagos) 6. Agreement with Lagos State Signage and Advertising Agency on collection of local levies 7. Introduction of more affordable ownership options for poorer traders as part of the market relocation scheme in Kano 8. Passage of the Federal Capital Territory Authority (FCTA) transport policy 9. Creation of two industrial parks in Enugu state

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10. Change in policy by the National Council on Agriculture on fertilizer distribution Purpose level impact (Number of additional dialogues held per year)

2

1. Equipment Leasing Association of Nigeria (ELAN) dialogues on the Equipment Leasing Bill 2. 5 BER roundtables by Lagos Chamber of Commerce and Industry (LCCI) 3. Miyetti Allah Cattle Breeders Association of Nigeria (MACBAN) dialogue on securing grazing reserves 4. Business Environment Network roundtable at the National Assembly 5. FCTA transport policy dialogue 6. African Institute for Applied Economics (AIAE) South East BECANS forum 7. Fertilizer Producers and Suppliers Association of Nigeria (FEPSAN) fertilizer policy dialogue 8. Kano State Traders Union (KaSTU) on stall ownership options 9. 2 dialogues on regulation of the mortgage industry and reform to the Land Use Act by MBAN 10. Presidential dialogue by OPS 11. AIAE South East Economic Summit with South East Nigeria Economic Commission (SENEC)

GOAL AND PURPOSE LEVEL IMPACT: OCTOBER 2011 – MARCH 2012 The period October 2011 to March 2012 was an eventful one for ENABLE. This section provides greater detail on all goal and purpose level results recorded by ENABLE over the past six months.

2.1

Goal level impact

During the current reporting period, ENABLE recorded two cases of goal-level impact, ahead of target. Logframe Indicator

Number of additional policy/ regulatory/ legislative improvements made

Target (Sept 2011 to March 2012)

1 policy/ regulatory/ legislative change

Impact in last six months

2 policy/ regulatory/ legislative changes

2.2

Changes to the Cashless Nigeria policy

The Cashless Nigeria policy is an initiative by the CBN. This policy is designed to encourage the use of debit cards, points of sales, etc. as an alternative to cash. According to CBN data, approximately 75% of all circulating cash is held outside the banking system. The policy originally had a daily withdrawal or deposit limit for individuals of 150,000 Naira with a 10% deposit and withdrawal charge for amounts past this limit.

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Although the policy has been in the pipeline for a while, it was drawn up with minimal involvement from either the private sector or bank customers. This also led to a huge gap in awareness, even on the eve of the launch of the pilot in Lagos state. In November 2011, ENABLE’s BMO partner Electronic Payment Providers Association of Nigeria (E-PPAN) conducted a grassroots sensitisation survey which came up with a surprising array of issues, hitherto unknown to CBN. This survey made recommendations specifically targeting the issue of withdrawal and deposit limits and charges. These recommendations were passed on to CBN for their consideration. During February of 2012, E-PPAN held its final consultation with members, from which emerged a six point list of recommendations on implementation of the policy. Simultaneously, ENABLE’s other BMO partners, the Institute of Directors (IoD) and LCCI, both held separate roundtable discussions on the policy, and brought to light other regulatory and implementation issues. These discussions were well covered by media. ENABLE media partners, Wazobia FM Lagos and The Daily trust, both covered the policy in detail. Wazobia held an hour long programme on the issue of Cashless Nigeria in their weekly business programme at the end of February of 2012. The Daily Trust covered the issue extensively, starting from September 2011 with a series of in-depth articles. Based on a comparative analysis of newspaper articles conducted by ENABLE, Daily Trust was found to have produced the most investigative coverage on the issue of any of the major Nigerian newspapers. As a result of the pressure created by ENABLE partner BMOs and media agencies, in March CBN revised their regulations to increase the deposit and withdrawal limits to 500,000 Naira for individuals. The charges associated with withdrawals and deposits beyond the limit were reduced to 2% and 3% respectively (from the previous levels of 10%). This change is expected to have significant impact on SMEs and micro-traders . The change will particularly benefit businesses and entrepreneurs engaged in bulky cash transactions, such as cattle breeders. Although multiple ENABLE partners have been involved in bringing about the change in the policy, ENABLE has so far been able to attribute the change to E-PPAN. “E-PPAN is a valued partner. Their feedback following the grass-root mobilisation helped influence CBN’s decision to review the Cashless Policy” Chidi Umeano, Head Shared Services, CBN (22/03/2012) In the coming period, ENABLE will investigate the contribution made by other ENABLE partners, and will produce estimates of the impact of the change on poor men and women (including estimates of the number of people benefiting, and the income increase resulting from the change).

2.3

Changes to FMTI draft Trade Policy

FMTI conducted a consultation session with the private sector seeking feedback on the Draft Trade and Investment Policy. The session was held in Lagos on the 23rd of February 2012 and was attended by officials of FMTI and BMOs such as the Manufacturers Association of Nigeria (MAN), the Nigerian - British Chamber of Commerce (NBCC), the National Association of Nigerian Traders (NANTS), the National Association of Chambers of Commerce, Industries, Mining and Agriculture (NACCIMA) and LCCI. At the end of the consultation, the FMTI committee accepted six of the 33 recommendations put forward. The six recommendations accepted covered the topics of trade in agricultural products, mainstreaming of cross border informal trade, and introducing more efficient border control systems to increase the efficiency of cross border trade. ENABLE anticipates that the group most affected by the changes, once implemented, will be informal Page | 9

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traders, the majority of whom are female small or micro enterprises. With the mainstreaming of cross border informal trade, this group can benefit from reduced multiple levies and harassment by officials. The revised draft is in FMTI for approval. In the coming period, ENABLE will monitor the movement of the draft towards passage and implementation. Additionally, as the process has already been fraught with bureaucratic pitfalls and delays, ENABLE will continue supporting the stakeholders in overcoming bottlenecks and pushing forward with approval and implementation. Special focus will be given on the design and completion of an assessment of potential beneficiaries of this policy change.

2.4

Purpose level impact

Logframe indicator

Number of additional dialogues held per year

Target (October 2011 to March 2012)

5 additional dialogues

Impact in last six months

9 additional dialogues

During the last six months ENABLE has exceeded the target for purpose level impact. Impact was recorded across three of our four components. The dialogues addressed issues ranging from the fuel subsidy removal and multiple- taxation, to policy reversals and employment creation. The most significant dialogues were held on the draft policies in Trade and Food Safety as well as the ‘Cashless Nigeria’ initiative of CBN.

2.5

FMTI dialogue on draft Trade policy

On the 23rd of February 2012, FMTI hosted a dialogue session with the private sector for their inputs onto the draft Trade and Investment Policy. The session was well by both the public and private sector. The private sector delegation was represented by members of MAN, NANTS, NBCC, and ENABLE partners LCCI and NACCIMA. The dialogue led to the development of 33 recommendations. Of these 33 recommendations, six were accepted by the Ministry. In the coming period, ENABLE will build on this dialogue by supporting stakeholders to ensure passage and implementation of the revised policy.

2.6

FMoH dialogue on draft Food Safety Policy

ENABLE supported Federal Ministry of Health (FMoH) to conduct a series of consultations with regulators and the private sector on the draft Food Safety Policy. As well as providing support to FMoH, ENABLE supported the private sector to formulate a list of recommendations which were then presented to the relevant authorities of FMoH in a roundtable session organised by the Ministry. The dialogue sessions were well represented by all stakeholders and were very inclusive in its discussions. The consultation scored 3.87 (on a scale of 1 to 5) in an ENABLE scoring exercise. ENABLE expects to see greater collaboration between the agency and the private sector in moving this dialogue further on to a goal level change. “Whenever somebody mention food poisoning, they look at us [the food vendors]. So we feel it important for us to come to this event and talk about our views and issues”, Rukayah Usman Isa, Member, FVA, FMoH dialogue (29/03/2012)

2.7

E-PPAN, IoD and LCCI dialogues on Cashless Nigeria Policy

As mentioned earlier, the Cashless Nigeria Policy was a well discussed and researched topic for several of our components. These discussions eventually led to a goal level change in the form of Page | 10

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a revision of the withdrawal and deposit limits and their associated charges for individuals and businesses. One of the discussion sessions, the roundtable arranged by IoD, attracted 2.75 Million Naira in sponsorships from CBN and Interswitch, which points to a high likelihood of IoD’s advocacy and dialogue initiatives being sustained. The event scored 3.43 (on a scale of 1 to 5) in an ENABLE scoring exercise. The quality of discussion (balance, substance, and openness) was particularly good. The goal level change recorded was an attributable result of separate PPD events held by ENABLE partners E-PPAN, IoD and LCCI. Although, ENABLE has been able to ascertain the link between the change in the regulations and E-PPAN’s interaction with CBN, the links between the others and the change is not so clear. In the coming period, ENABLE will follow up on the links between the impact and the dialogues held by partners other than E-PPAN.

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D

OUTPUT-LEVEL IMPACT Activities in the last six months centered around deepening of existing partnerships as well as stimulating replication of improved practices among ENABLE partners and other system players. Existing partnerships were made stronger by providing more sophisticated support on areas such as targeted fundraising, marketing or consultation process mentoring. Alongside deepening and replication, scale was also emphasised through the greater engagement of scale agents in interventions such as NACCIMA, Public Training Institutes (PTIs) such as Administrative Staff College of Nigeria (ASCON), Wazobia FM Lagos and The National Bureau of Statistics (NBS). The most significant activities and the current status of those activities for each of the components are shown below:

1

OUTPUT 1: BMOS Despite the difficult operating environment, the BMO Component has successfully delivered an ambitious set of activities. As well as providing low-level support to more mature partners, such as LCCI and MBAN, the component has provided intensive support to newer partners, with some notable early results. In particular, in the last six months the IoD and NACCIMA partnerships have shown rapid progress – in the next six months ENABLE will look to fully leverage the potential of these strategically important organisations. In the last six months, a key lesson for the BMO Component has been the importance of organising around specific business environment issues, as seen in the case of Cashless Nigeria – ENABLE is far more likely to engender goal-level impact if it supports multiple stakeholders to advocate and consult on a given issue. As well as supporting multiple BMOs to advocate for an issue, this also means working in synergy with other ENABLE components and other donor programmes. For example, the BMO Component has over the past six months engaged with both GEMS 1 and 2 for collaborative interventions. Looking ahead, the BMO Component will also be engaging in new partnerships with scale and replication in mind. For example, the BMO Component will start working with NYSC on developing an intervention centering on the provision of low cost research skills to BMOs. Table 5: Table of activities and status for BMO Component Partner(s)

Activities

Status and output-level impact

KASTU

Review of constitution of the BMO

Kano State Traders Union (KASTU) is the umbrella body of market traders in Kano State. ENABLE supported KASTU on doing an assessment of their constitution to improve on their organisational strengths. Upon review of the constitution, KASTU on its own initiative, organised and disseminated their revised constitution. This shows increase in the value of advocacy to KASTU members. ENABLE will follow up on the developments of KASTU for signs of sustainability of practice change in running the BMO

MBAN/ LUAAAG

Support on organising roundtable sessions with stakeholders on the Land Use Act

In the early part of year three, ENABLE supported MBAN in successfully lobbying for a change in the Cashless Policy exempting PMIs and MFBs from CBN charges for cash W&D. MBAN is now using their past experiences in advocacy in organising Land Use Act Amendment Advocacy Page | 12

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Partner(s)

Activities

Status and output-level impact Group (LUAAAG) and spearheading the discussion on the implementation of the Land Use Act. ENABLE will continue to provide support to LUAAAG through strengthening their capacity to incorporate evidence into the advocacy process as well as refining their advocacy strategy to bring about positive change on the issue of the Land Use Act

IoD

Support for organisational strengthening, developing a governance blueprint, and setting up a PPD platform

ENABLE activities with IoD over the past six months have led to significant strengthening of the advocacy capacity of the BMO through the hiring of a research and advocacy manager as well as a new DG. This strengthening has been reflected in the development of the governance blueprint and successful delivery of three workshops on the blueprint in Lagos, Kaduna and Cross River states. Additionally, IoD successfully held a well attended PPD event on ‘Cashless Nigeria’. For this event, IoD secured 2.75 Million Naira in sponsorships from CBN and Interswitch

NACCIMA

Support in linking CPPA to NACCIMA to provide evidence for dialogue on the Removal of Fuel Subsidy; provide guidance on engagement with FMTI on the draft Policy on Trade and Investment; provide guidance on organising private sector inputs to the draft Food Safety Policy

ENABLE helped establish the linkage between a research organisation, CPPA, to NACCIMA to provide evidence for dialogue organised by NACCIMA on the Removal of Fuel Subsidy. The resulting dialogue developed a communiqué of recommendations focusing on a gradual removal of fuel subsidy which was then forwarded to the President of Nigeria. The president’s office eventually tasked FMTI to follow up on the recommendations by discussing further with NACCIMA. NACCIMA has shown impressive progress in consultation and dialogue practices as also seen in their role in leading the private sector delegates at the FMoH dialogue on the Draft Food Safety Policy and their role as the Secretariat of the OPS.

E-PPAN

Support on organisational strengthening through member consultation and advocacy

E-PPAN was supported by ENABLE on the issues of member consultation and advocacy capacity building. To date, EPPAN has shown strong progress in its capacity for consulting members, which has resulted in marked improvements in members support for advocacy. A grassroots sensitisation exercise in November 2011 on the Cashless policy produced a set of recommendations for CBN, which eventually led to a revision of the cash withdrawal and deposit limits as well as associated charges.

KADCCIMA

Support KADCCIMA in improving member services and consultation practices and

With ENABLE support, KADCCIMA has developed capacity in and implemented innovative member consultation tools such as the Tax Diary to address the issue of multiple taxation. Along with research on the subject provided by ENABLE research partner FUSION, KADCCIMA is preparing Page | 13

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Partner(s)

2

Activities

Status and output-level impact

launching a PPD platform

for an upcoming dialogue on the issue of multiple levies in Kaduna State. So far, the activities aiding the advocacy of the issue have been well received by the members, and such the organisation is working towards creation of a sustainable PPD platform

PARE

Support in conducting research and organising a dialogue session on grazing reserves

The advocacy process for the issuance of grazing reserves for cattle is in its final stages. ENABLE assisted PARE in doing targeted fundraising and research to showcase the value of grazing reserves towards improving the quality of life for pastoralists and its attendant effect on cattle production as was postulated in the Case Study on the Kachia Grazing Reserve in Kaduna.

LAPAN/ FLG

Support in advocating for the inclusion of the Leather industry as a beneficiary of the CBN business intervention fund NISRAL

ENABLE in collaboration with GEMS 1 engaged LAPAN and FLG in strengthening their advocacy capacity, resulting in a dialogue with CBN around the inclusion of the Leather value chain into Nigerian Incentive Based Risk Sharing System for Agricultural Lending (NISRAL), CBN’s intervention fund promoting business growth. ENABLE also supported the BMOs in articulating their proposal to CBN on the conditions for accessing the fund (loan guideline). ENABLE will continue the collaboration with GEMS 1 on these partners to follow up on the implementation of the change to the guidelines for NISRAL

ACEN

Support in advocating for inclusion of ACEN to the regulatory body COREN

ENABLE partnered with GEMS 2 in engaging ACEN to support their advocacy initiative on the issue of inclusion of ACEN to the regulatory body for engineers, COREN. This is aimed at increasing ACEN influence in policy formulations relevant to the field of engineering. Future ENABLE support will be aimed at assisting in targeted fundraising for development of an industry paper highlighting the local engineering professionals

OUTPUT 2: GOVERNMENT The last six months has seen exciting developments in the Government Component. Partnerships have been maturing and more MDAs, such as NIPC and FIRS are keen on changing their consultation and dialogue practices. Amongst existing partnerships, a need for increased inclusiveness in dialogue has been identified and pursued as showcased by the consultation activities of FMTI and FMoH. This need for a wider consultation saw the inclusion of multiple propoor and gender sensitive BMOs in the dialogues. For example, the FMoH organised a PPD event on the topic of inputs to the draft Food Safety Policy. The PPD event demonstrated the capacity of FMoH to conduct an accurate stakeholder mapping as well as their understanding of the need to involve a wide range of stakeholders. This characteristic was further underlined by the insistence of FMoH to include the Food Vendors Association of Nigeria (FVA), an organisation of small and micro food producers, processors and vendors, into the dialogue as it was understood that the most significant impact of the Food Safety Policy would be on the FVA members.

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Additionally, both these policies, if approved, have huge beneficial implications to SMEs and especially micro-traders in the informal food and trading sectors in Nigeria. In the past six months, the Government Component at ENABLE also commenced work on specific interventions with service providers such as PTIs and staff from Lagos State Ministry Of Information (LsMOI). The purposes of these interventions are to deepen partnerships and achieve significant purpose and goal level impacts through use of scale agents such as PTIs and LsMOI staff. It is anticipated that the capacity built within the PTIs and some key LsMOI staff would have a replication effect on other ministries as well as on personnel who are trained by the PTIs. A key learning of the Government Component has been the need for exploiting synergies between stakeholders to achieve greater impact. For example, having a strong private sector presence in the dialogues with FMoH on the Draft Food Safety Policy resulted in a more efficient progress in the process of including stakeholder recommendations in the policy. In the coming year, more activities centering on specific business environment issues and greater synergies between stakeholders will be conducted to achieve higher level impacts amongst the MDA partners. Table 6: Table of activities and status for the MDA Component Partner(s)

Activities

Status and output-level impact

FMoH

Supporting consultation of stakeholders in the formulation of the Draft Food Safety Policy

FMoH demonstrated a change at the purpose level through the holding of an inclusive dialogue on the review of the draft Food Safety Policy involving all relevant public and private stakeholders. Through this event, FMoH demonstrated growth in their capacity to conduct stakeholder mappings and stakeholder consultation. The ministry also showed impressive understanding of the need for wider consultations and this was characterised by their insistence to include FVA in the dialogue, based on their perception that FVA would be the most impacted group through the implementation of the Food Safety Policy. Following the successful initial dialogues with the BMOs and regulators, FMoH is poised to hold a final session with all stakeholders harmonising the recommendations for change of the draft Food Safety Policy. This intervention has a good potential for having large pro poor impact at the goal level especially on small and micro producers, processors and vendors of food commodities

FMTI

Supporting consultation of stakeholders in the formulation of the Draft Trade Policy

FMTI held a consultation event concerning inputs to the draft Policy of Trade and Investment which was well attended by relevant public and private sector actors. The PPD event showcased how the BMOs can put Page | 15

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Partner(s)

Activities

Status and output-level impact pressure on their relevant MDAs to achieve inclusive consultation. As a response, FMTI also showed a willingness to engage BMOs in dialogue as well as to pick up their recommendations for consideration as was seen relevant. Building on the success of having recommendations to improving the draft Trade and Investment Policy accepted by FMTI, ENABLE will continue to support the ministry as well as relevant BMOs present to follow up on the acceptance of the changes

LGA ministries

Provision of training to staff of 25 LGAs in Kaduna state on communication of regulations of taxation as well as consultation on the removal of multiple taxation

The staffs representing all 25 LGAs in Kaduna state LGA ministry have completed their training. A set of pilot activities assessing the effectiveness of the training will be conducted in three of the 25 LGAs in Kaduna. The results of the pilot will guide the implementation in the other LGAs in Kaduna replication in LGAs in Kano and Cross River states

LsMOC

Supporting development of consultative practices within the ministry to facilitate the Artisan Conference in Lagos involving grassroots organisations

The LsMOC is in the process of organising a conference including grassroots organisations representing bricklayers, hairdressers, carpenters, bakers etc. from the greater Lagos area. So far the ministry has demonstrated impressive improvements in mapping relevant stake holders, and bringing up issues that would be relevant for the grassroots audience. The major goals of this conference is to induce a dialogue between senior LsMOC officials and grassroots BMOs as well as expose the grassroots BMOs to various avenues of finance supporting their businesses

LsMOI

Development of ToT and provision of ToT to 25 staff members at LsMOI on communication and evaluation of policy

In the past six months, 25 staff members of LsMOI have been trained in the communication and evaluation of policy. This intervention has a high potential for internal replication as each of the trained staff member at LsMOI is expected to train at least 10 others within the same ministry.

NPC

Supporting the development of consultation and communication practices within NPC

The intervention is targeting capacity building for communication and implementation of three important federal government policies: Vision 20:2020; Presidents Transformation Agenda and the SURE Program. The trainings of NPC staff are set to commence in the early part of year four with some implementation of Page | 16

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Partner(s)

Activities

Status and output-level impact the abovementioned policies targeted by end of year four. So far, NPC has shown significant buy in to the intervention ideas through the completion of preliminary trainings and formation of working groups. Additionally, NPC has got other agencies such as the Federal Ministry of Information and the National Orientation Agency on board thus improving the chances of impact

In addressing the need for scale and replication, ENABLE has already or will engage in new partnerships over the coming year. The focus of partner selection will be effectiveness as scale agents as well as potential for replication, especially in Northern Nigeria. In this regard, ENABLE is in the process of signing MoUs with FIRS, CBN, LGA-Kaduna and Public Training Institutes such as ASCON, KBS, and PSSDC.

3

OUTPUT 3: MEDIA The key development in the Media Component for the last six months was the emergence of several cases of replication. Building on the success of Da Rarrafe (Freedom FM) in Kano, we have seen similar attempts to launch business programming in Kano State Radio, Peace FM Maiduguri and Liberty FM in Kaduna. All three radio stations have a high percentage of the lower socio economic classes as listeners, along with a significant percentage of female listeners. Such replication has the potential of eliciting change in the business environment in an area much larger than the ENABLE focal states. Alongside external replication, ENABLE has also identified targets for internal replication with significant implications on the poorer citizens of Nigeria and women. With ENABLE’s work with Wazobia FM Lagos, we are targeting Wazobia’s other stations in Port Harcourt, Abuja and Kano as potential replication targets. The three radio stations boast significant percentages of poor and women listeners. By achieving replication in these three stations, we can accelerate the impact of media on changing business environment issues, specifically issues that affect the poor and women. Another exciting development is the significant progress made on the marketing front. With ENABLE support, the Freedom marketing team successfully secured sponsorship from CBN for Da Rarrafe. The sponsorship deal greatly improves the prospects for sustainability. Daily Trust and Wazobia have also shown improvements in their marketing capacity; ENABLE is optimistic that both partners will be able to secure sponsorship during the next few months. The Media Component will also be looking at engaging in new partnerships to achieve greater scale and impact. A potential partner for deepening impact in the Media Component, along with our identified replication partners, has been Lagos Television (LTV). LTV boasts a significant number of poor and women viewers. Additionally, LTV will serve the component in bringing balance to its portfolio of partners, being the only television partner, thus increasing the chances of impact. Table 7: Table of activities and status for Media Component Partner(s)

Activities

The Daily Trust

Support specific

Status and output level Impact on product Building up on previous successes in investigative marketing, journalism by The Daily Trust journalists, ENABLE Page | 17

ENABLE Progress Report #6

Partner(s)

Activities

Status and output level Impact

investigative has followed up with providing marketing support journalism and setting and support on setting up of an Open Business up of a PPD platform Forum. So far, The Daily Trust is close to securing a sponsorship for its agriculture business page. Alongside the sponsorship, The Daily Trust Management has approved the investment in the holding of the first ever Open Business Forum (OBF) by the newspaper. The Daily Trust has so far committed 360,000 Naira towards the holding of the event. The inaugural session will be held on the topic of ‘Job Creation- Challenges and Opportunities’ Wazobia Lagos

FM Support the design and launch of a new business programme, including marketing support

Freedom Kano

FM Support on marketing The Freedom FM show Da Rarrafe has shown and programme impressive growth in its following and popularity. redesign The programme has now been extended to an hour from 30 minutes and a repeat show has been arranged for each week. The Freedom FM marketing team secured sponsorship from CBN for Da Rarrafe, pointing to a high degree of sustainability. ENABLE will continue to monitor the progress of Freedom FM Kano and work on using its example to generate replication amongst other radio stations in the Northern part of Nigeria

Independent Producers

Supporting independent producers in producing business environment documentaries and content

ENABLE helped Wazobia launch a weekly hour long show on local business environment issues in Lagos called ‘Eko, how una see am’. The show has had four broadcasts so far and has elicited impressive response amongst listeners. The shows average 50 phone ins and 40 to 45 messages. The Wazobia team is also close to securing a sponsorship/ marketing deal, which will ensure the long-term sustainability of the programme. Management is keen on replicating the success of this programme amongst other stations in their network, starting with the Port Harcourt station which has over 3.6mn listeners (61% of whom are defined as poor)

2 independent producers have been engaged and supported in the development of pilot scripts. During the intervention, access to finance was identified as a key constraint facing independent producers. In response, ENABLE has linked the independent producers to marketers with the aim of soliciting sponsorships or advertisements against the pilot script

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4

OUTPUT 4: INFORMATION The last six months has seen encouraging signs of a sustainable market for business environment research emerging. ENABLE has seen its BMO partner E-PPAN engage a research institute called TNS RMS to provide evidence for advocacy on the issue of Cashless Nigeria. Additionally, ENABLE partners FUSION, CPPA and KBS have been seen to secure commercial contracts with MDAs and BMOs in providing research support on a variety of topics such as multiple taxation and fuel subsidy removal. FUSION, along with supporting The Daily Trust with research for its Open Business Forum, is also supporting KadBIR on doing a tax payer perception survey. KBS has provided advocacy training and the advocacy curriculum to the Gender Working Group in Kaduna. All these signs point to a more vibrant research market with the potential of many more linkages being established between research institutes and other BMOs and MDAs. Over the past six months, ENABLE has also sought to work on low cost options for research to go around the problem of inability or unwillingness of BMOs and MDAs to pay for research services. To address this problem, ENABLE has started working with NBS as a source of low cost research and data for businesses. Another strategy followed by ENABLE so far has been the provision of direct capacity building support to partner BMO research departments. Through this intervention, in the absence of suitable or low cost data providers, the BMOs themselves can design and conduct their own research satisfactorily. For this intervention, we have been working with LCCI and KADCCIMA. Table 8: Table of activities and status for RI Component Partner(s)

Activities

Status and output level Impact

CPPA

Support CPPA in linking with BMOs in providing advocacy support; Support CPPA in communicating research

Center for Public Policy Alternatives (CPPA) provided research support services to NACCIMA and LCCI on the topics of Fuel Subsidy Removal and Multiple Taxation respectively. CPPA also provided research support for a town hall style dialogue session in Lagos on the topic of Fuel Subsidy removal

Fusion

Support to Fusion on marketing research as well as linking with BMOs in providing advocacy support

FUSION provided research support to Kaduna Chambers of Commerce, Industry, Mining and Agriculture (KADCCIMA) on the issue of multipletaxation as part of preparation, of the launch of the KADCCIMA PPD event. Additionally, Fusion is providing research support to The Daily Trust for its first Open Business Forum. The research was wholly supported by The Daily Trust, characterising the slow emergence of a sustainable market for research information

CRD

Support on the set up of a PPD platform

Center for Research and Documentation (CRD) conducted research and held its inaugural PPD dialogue centering on the topic of policy reversals in Kano. The event was well attended by members of various stakeholders and was covered by Freedom FM and The Daily Trust. CRD is currently providing research support to Freedom FM on its own Open Business Forum Page | 19

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5

Partner(s)

Activities

Status and output level Impact

NISER

Support NISER on the launch of seminar series to communicate research on the business environment

Nigerian Institute for Social and Economic Research (NISER) has held three seminars so far in the past six months. Topics ranged from employment to energy sector reform and were well attended by public and private sector stakeholders. A strike amongst researchers and other bureaucratic problems in NISER has interrupted the subsequent editions of the seminar series

PROGRAMME LEARNING AND DEVELOPMENT At the programme level ENABLE has made significant progress in three areas: impact assessment, knowledge management, and communications. For impact assessment, ENABLE has boosted in-house capacity by establishing a full time impact assessment position. ENABLE has also developed more efficient formats for impact logics, indicators and the M&E plans. ENABLE’s components are increasingly working together, in line with the programme’s strategy (i.e. the Phase 3 evolution towards toward system-wide interventions and impact). Effective knowledge management plays a key role in fully exploiting these synergies. In line with this goal, ENABLE has implemented Quarterly Strategic Reviews (QSRs) to improve communication and learning between programme components. The programme has also continued to integrate State Managers more effectively, for example clarifying reporting lines and ensuring participation in strategic planning activities. Additional measures include enhanced monthly reporting (Monthly Progress Reports and progress meetings). ENABLE’s impact assessment function has also upgraded the feeding back of performance and impact information to Component Managers, in order to more effectively guide future intervention design and delivery. A third key area is communication. ENABLE has been developing several new communication products both for programme as well as intervention purposes. At the programme level, ENABLE is in the process of developing a series of communications pieces for its audience which includes DFID-Nigeria, other DFID programmes, and the wider development community. ENABLE Updates will present exciting new results of ENABLE interventions while the ENABLE case studies will aim to look at significant impacts of ENABLE interventions in greater detail. ENABLE will also seek to invite DFID-Nigeria to attend more events run by programme partners, and plans are developing to run workshops for DFID-Nigeria and other programmes, focusing on specific topics of interest (for example ENABLE’s approach to media or impact assessment). At the intervention level, ENABLE will produce business cases and replication case studies which showcase incentives to behavior change as well as achievements of partners through interventions. The purpose of this type of communication material is to induce replication of behavior change in system actors (such as BMOs and MDAs).

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E

FINANCIAL SUMMARY Provided below is a summary of the programme spend in the periods between October 2011 and March 2012. £ 000's Oct-11 Nov-11 Dec-11 Jan-12 Feb-12 Actual/Forecast (A/F) A A A A A Management Team Fees 99 89 82 78 90 Expenses 19 63 74 27 40 Total (Management Team) 118 152 157 105 130 Managed Fund C1: BMO Capacity Building 21 51 33 7 36 C2: Media 16 33 16 0 26 C3: Government 47 95 20 13 30 C4: L, P & R Information 6 30 2 22 11 Technical Advisory Func 20 6 22 7 12 Marketing 0 0 0 0 0 Project Approval Comm 0 0 0 0 0 Bank charges 0 1 2 1 1 M&E 0 5 5 0 0 Management Team training 2 0 2 4 0 Total (Managed Fund) 112 222 102 53 116 Grand Total 229 374 258 159 246

Mar-12 F

Total

90 18 108

529 241 770

54 30 43 10 0 0 0 1 0 0 138 246

201 120 248 81 66 0 0 6 10 8 742 1,512

All spend figures are actual except for the month of March. The spend figure for March is based on spending forecast. Value For Money Over the past six months, ENABLE has consolidated its VfM framework and measurement tools. The ultimate goal is to mainstream VfM into the management cycle for the management of interventions. Given the late stage of the programme, VfM is going to feature more and more in deciding where to direct resources to achieve the highest levels of impact in a limited period of time. Over the next six months ENABLE will continue to develop its VfM tools, and will begin to report regularly on VfM results (such as resources leveraged, and cost per beneficiary). Page | 21

ENABLE Progress Report #6

F

LOGFRAME Level

Indicator

Goal Policy and regulatory environment for doing business improved

World Bank Doing Business report ranking Source: World Bank Doing Business Reports Business leaders' perception index of difficulty of doing business (1=no difficulty, 4=very difficult) Source: ENABLE Business Leaders’ Perception Survey Cumulative number of additional policy / regulatory / legislative improvements made Source: project case studies Cumulative number of people (entrepreneurs and workers) benefiting from policy / regulatory / legislative improvements (to be disaggregated by gender where possible) Source: project case studies Number of additional ‘dialogues’ held per year (to be disaggregated by media (a) and non-media dialogues) Source: project case studies Business leaders' satisfaction with level of public private dialogue on business issues index (1=not satisfied, 3=very satisfied) Source: ENABLE Business Leaders’ Perception Survey Improvement in composite ‘advocacy competence’ index (quality of advocacy) (b) among project-supported BMOs Source: self-diagnostic assessment (facilitated by project) Cumulative number of BMOs achieving a sustained improvement in their advocacy competence score (directly assisted BMOs and known cases of replication) Source: self-diagnostic assessment (facilitated by project)

Purpose To raise the level and quality of private sector advocacy and the effectiveness of public private dialogue in lead states and federal level Output 1 Business Membership Organizations (BMOs) demonstrate competence to engage in effective advocacy

Baseline (2009)

Target 1 (2011)

Target 2 (2012)

Target 3 (2013)

134

130

127

124

2.3

2.2

2.1

2.0

0

2

4

8

0

200k

500k

1,000k

0

5

10

15

1.95

2.00

2.10

2.20

0

5%

10%

20%

0

4

10

20

(e)

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Weight: 28% Output 2 Media proactively investigates and airs public policy and regulatory issues affecting private sector

Weight: 24% Output 3 Ministries, Departments & Agencies (MDAs) demonstrate willingness and capacity to engage with private sector

Weight: 28% Output 4 Effective and affordable support services (especially research provision) are available to BMOs and MDAs on a sustainable basis

Percentage of BMO members reporting satisfaction with the advocacy performance of their BMO (among project-supported BMOs) Source: BMO Members’ Surveys Improvement in composite ‘media quality’ index of project-supported business (c) media products Source: scoring of media products using project scorecard Cumulative number of business media products achieving a sustained improvement in media quality score (directly assisted products and known cases of replication) Source: scoring of media products using project scorecard Audience satisfaction rating of project-assisted business media products Source: project facilitated Focus Group Discussions (FGDs) Improvement in composite ‘dialogue capacity’ index in project-supported (d) MDAs Source: self-diagnostic assessment (facilitated by project) Cumulative number of MDAs achieving a sustained improvement in dialogue capacity score (directly assisted MDAs and known cases of replication) Source: self-diagnostic assessment (facilitated by project) Percentage of BMOs reporting an improvement in the dialogue capacity and openness of MDAs compared with 12 months ago Source: BMO Perception Survey Number of BMOs and MDAs obtaining business research from projectsupported research institutions or known cases of replication per year Source: project surveys Percentage of BMOs reporting satisfaction with the availability and quality of business research in Nigeria Source: BMO Perception Survey Number of BMOs / MDAs obtaining support services from project-supported providers or known cases of replication per year Source: project surveys

[TBC]

[TBC]

[TBC]

[TBC]

0

5%

10%

20%

0

4

10

20

n/a

40%

50%

60%

0

5%

10%

20%

0

3

6

10

[TBC]

[TBC]

[TBC]

[TBC]

0

4

6

10

[TBC]

[TBC]

[TBC]

[TBC]

0

4

6

10

Weight: 20%

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Notes: (a) For ‘dialogue’ to occur three things must happen: a BMO must present its position on an issue affecting business to the appropriate government representatives, the issue must be discussed (with input from both sides), and government must commit to next steps. A media dialogue is one that is convened at the initiative of an ENABLEsupported media partner. (b) The Advocacy Competence Index rates the capacity of a BMO to engage in effective advocacy and dialogue on a scale of 0 to 100 based on six criteria: relationships, organisation, resources, advocacy stages, advocacy tools & techniques, and results. The index is calculated using the ENABLE BMO Diagnostic Toolkit. (c) Media products are scored on a scale of 1 to 5, using the ENABLE Media Quality Scorecard, according to three ‘quality’ criteria: content & analysis, accessibility, and interactivity. (d) The dialogue capacity index rates the capacity and willingness of an MDA to engage in effective dialogue with the private sector on a scale of 0 to 100 based on six criteria: dialogue mechanisms, dialogue resources, targeting, consultation, information & communication, and attitudes to dialogue. (e) In the 2010 Doing Business Report (which is based on 2009 data), Nigeria was ranked 125. In the next Doing Business Report, changes were made to the methodology and Nigeria’s ranking based on 2009 data was revised down to 134 (the employing workers index, in which Nigeria ranked relatively highly, was removed).

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