CHAPTER 4: TECHNICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF SOLAR FARM

June 13, 2017 | Author: Nelson Johns | Category: N/A
Share Embed Donate


Short Description

Download CHAPTER 4: TECHNICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF SOLAR FARM...

Description

CHAPTER 4: TECHNICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF SOLAR FARM  

  4.1

PRINCIPLE OF ELECTRICITY PRODUCTION FROM SOLAR IRRADIANCE   Solar  irradiance  from  the  sun  can  provide  an  invaluable  source  of  energy.    Solar  energy is normally captured by solar panels which are so designed as to produce an  electric current from the heat captured from the sun irradiance.  The  electric  current  so  produced  is  controlled  by  a  Charge  Controller  which  feeds  a  battery system which produces the Direct Current (DC) power.  However,  DC  power  is  not  useful  for  everyday  life  use  and  for  industrial  use,  and  needs to be converted to Alternating Current (AC) power.  This is achieved by the use  of  inverters  –  which  convert  the  DC  power  into  AC  power  for  evacuation  onto  the  public utility power grid.  The above  principle of production  of  electricity from the  sun energy is simplistically  shown in the Figure 4.1 below:   

EIA Report1.doc 

©COPYRIGHT 

 

4‐1

Figure 4.1: Figure Showing Principle of Solar Power

EIA Report1.doc 

©COPYRIGHT 

 

4‐2

4.2

PLANT DIAGRAM AND FLOW CHART  Based on the above principle, a typical plant diagram/flow chart for the production of  electricity from solar power can be elaborated as given in Figure 2. 

  Figure 4.2: Typical Plant Diagram  4.3

SOLAR PLANT COMPONENTS  The solar plant will comprise of the following power‐producing components:  (i)

The solar panels array 

(ii)

The cabling networks 

(iii)

The inverters, complete with computerized platform. 

(iv)

The step‐up transformer  

(v)

The power evacuation lines 

The  above  power‐producing  components  will  be  backed‐up  and/or  serviced  by  the  following project components to offer the full spectrum of the facility.  i. The  Information and Welcome Centre   ii. The artisanal market place.  iii. The perimeter fencing  iv. The mountain‐top tree barrier. 

EIA Report1.doc 

©COPYRIGHT 

 

4‐3

The following sub‐sections fully describe each of the above‐listed components of the  solar farm, starting with the main power‐producing components.  4.4

SOLAR PANELS ARRAY  The  solar  panel  array  or  assembly  will  comprise  about  62,000  modules  (required  to  provide  the  15  MW  capacity)  facing  North  ‐  which  will  act  as  solar  captors.    Each  captor panel will be of the following dimension.  ƒ

Length: 1650mm 

ƒ

Width: 990mm 

ƒ

Thickness: 40mm 

Each panel will weigh 19.1kg.  The panel is provided with 6No grounding holes, 4No  mounting holes and 8No drainage holes.  The grounding holes allow for the passing of  grounding cables; the mounting holes allow for the fixing of the panel on to its fixing  frame, while the drainage holes provide for the excavation of rainwater.  Each panel is made up of the following construction materials and components:  ƒ

A front cover made of low‐iron tempered glass of 3.2mm thickness 

ƒ

A  set  of  60  multi‐crystalline  silicon  cells  of  dimensions  156mm  x  156mm  with  either 2 or 3 busbars. 

ƒ

An anodized aluminium frame of silver colour with the necessary edge sealing  made up of either silicone or tape. 

ƒ

A junction box with a IP65 protection degree or better. 

ƒ

A cable of length 1100mm of cross‐section area 4mm2. 

ƒ

A  plug  connector  of  type  MC4  with  a  protection  degree  to  standard  IP  67  or  equivalent  

4.5

DESCRIPTION OF PV PANELS 

4.5.1

Manufacturing Specifications  The  photo‐voltaic  panels  will  be  manufactured  by  the  Chinese  Yingli  Green  Energy  Holding Company Limited which is one of the world’s largest fully vertically integrated  PV manufacturers, which markets its products under the brand “Yingli Solar”.  With  over  4.5GW  of  modules  installed  globally,  the  company  is  the  leading  solar  energy  company built upon proven product reliability and sustainable performance. 

4.5.2

Performance  The  PV  panels  will  be  made  up  of  high  efficiency,  multicrystalline  silicon  solar  cells  with high transmission and textured glass which can deliver a module efficiency of up  to 16.2%.  Such a level of efficiency results in the minimization of the installation costs  and maximizing the kWh output of the system per unit area. 

EIA Report1.doc 

©COPYRIGHT 

 

4‐4

The PV panels are manufactured with a tight positive power tolerance of 0W to + 5W,  which ensures the production and delivery of modules at or above nameplate power  thereby  contributing  to  minimizing  module  mismatch  losses  leading  to  improved  system yield.  4.5.3

Reliability  Tests by independent laboratories prove that the PV modules: 

4.5.4

ƒ

Fully conform to certification and regulatory standards 

ƒ

Withstand  wind  loading  pressure  of  up  to  2.4kPa,  confirming  mechanical  stability 

ƒ

Successfully  endure  ammonia  and  salt‐mist  exposure  at  the  highest  severity  level,  ensuring  their  performance  in  adverse  conditions.    The  PV  panels  are  manufactured  to  international  standards  and  conform  to  ISO  9001:2008,  ISO  14001:2004 and BS OHSAS 18001: 2007. 

Warranties  From  a  sustainability  stand  point,  the  PV  panels  are  covered  by  a  10‐year  product  warranty, comprising to the following criteria: 

4.5.5

ƒ

Limited power warranty 10 years at 91.2% of the minimal rated power output,  

ƒ

25 years at 80.7% of the minimal rated power output. 

Qualifications and Certifications  The  manufacture  of  the  PV  panels  is  covered  by  the  following  qualifications  and  certificates:  IEC  61215,  IEC  61730,  MCS,  CE,  ISO  9001:2008,  ISO  14001:2004,  BS  OHSAS 18001:2007, SA 8000, PV Cycle.  The  Specification  and  Data  Sheet  enclosed  at  Annex  4A  at  the  end  of  Chapter  4  provides  additional  information  pertaining  to  conditions  electrical  performance,  the  thermal characteristics and the operating conditions of the PV panels – to which the  interested reader is referred. 

4.6

ASSEMBLY OF PV PANELS  The  assembly  of  the  PV  panels  array  which  will  be  a  fixed‐tilt  ground‐mounted  configuration, is achieved by the following methods:  (i)

Tilting  of  the  PV  panels  to  about  20o  to  the  horizontal  to  induce  maximum  exposure to sunlight 

(ii)

Bolting of the panels onto horizontal metallic I‐beams or angle‐irons placed at  intervals underneath the panel assembly area. 

(iii) Fixing  of  the  top  horizontal  I‐beams  or  angle  irons  onto  vertical  metallic  sections  or  square  metallic  tubes  held  in  position  by  a  horizontal  metallic                     EIA Report1.doc 

©COPYRIGHT 

 

4‐5

I‐beam at the bottom.  Bracing will also be carried out if judged necessary, to  produce additional structural stability.  (iv) Fixing the vertical metallic struts into the ground.  (v)

Each fixing hole will be 300m x 300m by 600mm deep, encased in concrete. 

The photographs below show:  ƒ

The  appearance/look  of  the  PV  panels  individually  and  in  the  arranged  array  system. 

ƒ

The horizontal supporting I‐beams 

ƒ

The vertical H‐section columns 

ƒ

The fixing holes embedded with concrete 

 

 

 

EIA Report1.doc 

©COPYRIGHT 

 

4‐6

  Photographs Showing General Arrangement and Fixing of PV Panels  It should be noted that he fixing height above the existing ground level will be of the  order of 1.5‐1.8 metres.  At this height above ground level, ease of installation will be  achieved, and most importantly the PV panel array will be protected from high winds  during cyclones, thereby ensuring their sustainability in the future.  4.7

FOUNDATION AND MOUNTING STRUCTURE  The  mounting  system  is  a  dual‐axis  system  with  double‐supported  and  strutted  frames for increased load resistance and weak soils.  Depending on the condition on  the  site,  up  to  5  (five)  standard  modules  can  be  installed  horizontally  or  3  (three)  modules  can  be  installed  vertically.    The  preferred  inclination  angle  is  20  (twenty)  degrees for maximum sunshine irradiance.  The  foundation  of  the  mounting  system  shall  be  screw  foundation  or  concrete  foundation.  This consideration will be finalized during the detailed design stage of the project and  prior to start of works on site.  A typical mounting arrangement is reproduced in Figure 4.3 below 

EIA Report1.doc 

©COPYRIGHT 

 

4‐7

  Figure 4.3: Typical Mounting Arrangement   4.8

CABLING NETWORKS  Each  panel  or  set  of  panels  will  be  linked  to  an  electrical  cable  as  shown  in  the  photographs below:   

   

EIA Report1.doc 

©COPYRIGHT 

 

4‐8

  Photographs Showing Electrical Cable  These individual cables will be entrenched as shown in the photographs above, and  connect  into  bigger‐size  cables.    As  the  number  of  cables  linking  bigger  areas  of  PV  panels increase, it gives rise to bundles of cables which will be laid in trenches dug at  600mm depth.  All cable trenches will be fitted with a 75mm thick bedding made up of either coral  sand or rock sand.  These cable bundles go to the Charge Controller and the Battery  system for the collection of the entire DC power system of the solar power plant.  A  typical arrangement of such a bundle of electrical cables laid in a trench on top of the  bedding is shown in the photographs below. 

 

EIA Report1.doc 

©COPYRIGHT 

 

4‐9

  Photographs Showing Bundles of Electrical Cables in Trenches  4.9

DESCRIPTION OF INVERTERS  The Inverters constitute the main core component of the solar plant insofar as they  connect  the  DC  power  from  the  Charge  Controller  and  the  Battery  System  into  the  solely‐utilized AC power.  A photograph of such an Inverter cabinet is reproduced below: 

  Photograph of a Typical Inventor 

EIA Report1.doc 

©COPYRIGHT 

 

4‐10

The  Inverters  proposed  to  be  installed  at  the  Bambous  Solar  Plant  will  be  of  the  ‘Sunny  Central”  type  whose  actual  ratings  will  be  fixed  at  the  design  stage  of  the  project.  The main characteristics of the proposed inverters are listed below:  ƒ

They will be up to 1 megawatt system power as standard. 

ƒ

Maximum yields with low system cots  Note:  This  inverter  characteristic  will  ensure  economic  advantages  for  the  project 

ƒ

Full nominal power in continuous operation at ambient temperatures of up to  50o C.  Note: This invertor characteristic is of utmost importance insofar as at Bambous  high  ambient  temperatures  may  be  experienced  on  extremely  sunny  days  in  summer. 

ƒ

Possibility  of  intelligent  power  management,  via  an  interfacing  with  the  appropriate software. 

ƒ

 Adaptation  to  a  wide  range  of  DC input  voltage  for  flexible  use  of  various  PV  modules configurations 

ƒ

Perfectly adjusted for the temperature dependent behavior of PV generators 

ƒ

Includes all grid management functions. 

A number of inverters will be required for the 15mW production plant. They will be  enclosed in a building fitted with corridors which will provide easy and ready access  to the inverter units.  All  the  inverters  will  be  connected  to  a  customized  computer  platform  or  programmable logical controller (PLC) –  which will allow for the optimal  monitoring  and control of the solar plant.  The Specification and Data Sheet of the proposed inverter is enclosed at Annex 4B at  the  end  of  Chapter  4  –  to  which  the  reader  is  referred,  should  he  be  interested  in  having  information  on  technical  data,  such  as  Input  DC,  Output  AC,  efficiency,  protective devices, general data and other features.  4.10

FEATURES OF STEP‐UP TRANSFORMER  The power output from the inverter, of rating 22kV will require step‐up to 66kV for  connection  to  the  public  grid  at  the  CEB  sub‐station  at  La  Chaumiere.    For  this  purpose a step‐up transformer, which will be housed in a building, at the end of the  farm, will be installed.  The transformer will be supplied by Schneider Electric.   

EIA Report1.doc 

©COPYRIGHT 

 

4‐11

Its  technical  features,  specifications  and  data  are  provided  in  the  Specification  and  Data Sheet enclosed at Annex 4C at the end of the Chapter.  The transformer room will be constructed on the flat part of the site at its northern  top.  This  position  will  allow  for  the  shortest  route  of  the  power  excavation  line.    At  this  position,  the  housing  building  will  also  require  basic  standard  strip  footing  and  separate  column‐base  foundations.    Depending  on  site  conditions,  however,  such  standard  foundation  may  be  modified  to  shallow  bases  and  ground  beams  as  required.   4.11

POWER EVACUATION LINE  From the step‐up transformer, the 66kV power line will be connected to the CEB La  Chaumiere  sub‐station,  through  a  66kV  power  line  which  will  run  from  the  transformer room at the site to the CEB sub‐station, over a total distance of 3.9km.  The  alignment  of  the  evacuation  line  is  as  shown  on  the  context  plan  enclosed  at  Annex 1B at the end of Chapter 1 entitled “Project Particulars”   The  alignment  of  the  power  evacuation  line  will  run  across  bare  lands,  forest  lands  and unhabituated areas, without therefore bearing any environmental impact on any  human receptor. 

4.12

INFORMATION AND WELCOME CENTRE  The Information and Welcome Centre will be housed in a building of about 30 square  metres in size.  It will   (i)

Provide space for visitors while on a visiting tour of the solar farm installations. 

(ii)

Accommodate training facilities at the site, in the form of lecture room, fitted  with  all  the  necessary  accessories  and  appliances,  where  lectures  on  the  operation  and  benefits  of  the  green  renewable  energy  concept  of  the  solar  farm will be presented. 

The building is located towards the western portion of the site, within close distance  to the main entrance gate and the parking area. This means that the visitors will not  have to walk long distances on their visit to the solar farm.  The  centre  will  be  used  for  visit  and  educational  purposes,  in  line  with  the  Government’s policy of Maurice Ile Durable (MID) concept, and create awareness and  education among school and college children and the mauritian population at large.  The layout and front‐elevation of the Information and Welcome Centre are enclosed  at Annex 4D at the end of Chapter. 

EIA Report1.doc 

©COPYRIGHT 

 

4‐12

4.13

ARTISANAL MARKET PLACE  The  project  finally  incorporates  the  setting‐up  of  an  artisanal  market  place  –  which  will constitute an open‐air sheltered space where hand‐made materials representing  the solar farm will be displayed for sale, after having been manufactured by the local  women entrepreneurs of the Médine and Bambous Villages.  This artisanal market place will occupy an area of about 100m2 – which will be open  but covered, and put at the disposal of the interested local population.  The targeted artisanal products can be:  ƒ

 Hats with the logo of the solar farm 

ƒ

Paintings showing the general installations of the solar farm 

ƒ

Carvings related to the solar farm 

ƒ

Tee‐shirts with any interesting feature of the solar farm. 

The intrinsic purpose of this artisanal market place as envisaged by the promoter will  be the social link with the local population, and the gender empowerment potential  afforded by the project, insofar as the women entrepreneurs of the local population  will  be  targetted.    This  is  considered  to  be  an  enhancement  opportunity  offered  by  the solar farm project.  4.14

PERIMETER FENCING  It  is  envisaged  to  provide  fencing  all  along  the  site  boundary  to  keep  the  site  safe  from intruders but more importantly from stray animals which can damage the cells.   The perimeter fencing will thus be erected to provide site security against vandalism  and animals finding their way into the site‐premises.  At this point in the project procurement cycle, it is envisaged to place a galvanized‐ pole supported chain‐link fencing around the periphery of the project site.  A photograph of the typical chain‐link fencing proposed is reproduced below: 

  Photograph of Chain‐Link Fencing 

EIA Report1.doc 

©COPYRIGHT 

 

4‐13

4.15

MOUNTAIN‐TOP TREE BARRIER  It is proposed to install all along the boundary of the site along the mountain‐top a  tree  barrier  which  will  consist  of  our  row  of  Eucalyptus  trees  and  one  row  of  Ficus  tree, planted in a staggered fashion.  The purpose of this double line tree barrier is described below:  (i)

It will provide stabilization of the mountain‐top area overlooking the solar farm,  through its root penetration action. 

(ii)

It  will  act  as  protection  against  accidental  rolling  of  any  boulder  along  the  mountain slope – which can cause damage to the solar panels 

(iii)

It will provide some shade along the mountain‐top area of the site. 

(iv)

It will induce an environment of naturally landscaped area, which will produce  in‐turn a positive visual impact.  The  positioning  and  alignment  of  the  trees  barrier  along  the  southern  (mountain‐top) boundary of the site are shown in the site layout plan enclosed  at Annex 4E at the end of Chapter 4. 

EIA Report1.doc 

©COPYRIGHT 

 

4‐14

View more...

Comments

Copyright � 2017 SILO Inc.
SUPPORT SILO